Cognitive Regeneration and the Noetic Effects of Sin : Why Theology and Cognitive Science May Not Be Compatible

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Launonen , L 2021 , ' Cognitive Regeneration and the Noetic Effects of Sin : Why Theology and Cognitive Science May Not Be Compatible ' , European Journal for Philosophy of Religion , vol. 13 , no. 3 , pp. 113-137 . https://doi.org/10.24204/ejpr.2021.3398

Title: Cognitive Regeneration and the Noetic Effects of Sin : Why Theology and Cognitive Science May Not Be Compatible
Author: Launonen, Lari
Contributor organization: Faculty of Theology
Date: 2021-10
Language: eng
Number of pages: 25
Belongs to series: European Journal for Philosophy of Religion
ISSN: 1689-8311
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24204/ejpr.2021.3398
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/334810
Abstract: Justin Barrett and Kelly James Clark have suggested that cognitive science of religion supports the existence of a god-faculty akin to senses divinitatis. They propose that God may have given rise to the god-faculty via guided evolution. 'phis suggestion raises two theological worries. First, our natural cognition seems to favor false god-beliefs over true ones. Second, it also makes us prone to tribalism. If God hates idolatry and moral evil, why would he give rise to mind with such biases? A Plantingian response would point to the noetic effects of sin. Such a response, however, would have to assume that God is restoring the minds of believers. This paper considers empirical reasons to doubt that such a process is taking place.
Subject: 614 Theology
REFORMED EPISTEMOLOGY
RELIGION
MEMBERSHIP
ATHEISTS
Peer reviewed: Yes
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: acceptedVersion


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