Canine hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention share similar demographic risk factors and behavioural comorbidities with human ADHD

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Sulkama , S , Puurunen , J , Salonen , M , Mikkola , S , Hakanen , E , Araujo , C & Lohi , H 2021 , ' Canine hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention share similar demographic risk factors and behavioural comorbidities with human ADHD ' , Translational Psychiatry , vol. 11 , no. 1 , 501 . https://doi.org/10.1038/s41398-021-01626-x

Title: Canine hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention share similar demographic risk factors and behavioural comorbidities with human ADHD
Author: Sulkama, Sini; Puurunen, Jenni; Salonen, Milla; Mikkola, Salla; Hakanen, Emma; Araujo, Cesar; Lohi, Hannes
Contributor organization: Hannes Tapani Lohi / Principal Investigator
Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics
Veterinary Biosciences
Helsinki One Health (HOH)
Veterinary Genetics
Biosciences
Date: 2021-10-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Translational Psychiatry
ISSN: 2158-3188
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41398-021-01626-x
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/335303
Abstract: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder impairing the quality of life of the affected individuals. The domestic dog can spontaneously manifest high hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattention which are components of human ADHD. Therefore, a better understanding of demographic, environmental and behavioural factors influencing canine hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattention could benefit both humans and dogs. We collected comprehensive behavioural survey data from over 11,000 Finnish pet dogs and quantified their level of hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattention. We performed generalised linear model analyses to identify factors associated with these behavioural traits. Our results indicated that high levels of hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattention were more common in dogs that are young, male and spend more time alone at home. Additionally, we showed several breed differences suggesting a substantial genetic basis for these traits. Furthermore, hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattention had strong comorbidities with compulsive behaviour, aggressiveness and fearfulness. Multiple of these associations have also been identified in humans, strengthening the role of the dog as an animal model for ADHD.
Subject: ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER
OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER
AGGRESSIVE DOGS
DOMESTIC DOG
DEFICIT
NEUROBIOLOGY
CHILDREN
PREVALENCE
MECHANISMS
VALIDITY
413 Veterinary science
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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