Impulse oscillometry and free-running tests for diagnosing asthma and monitoring lung function in young children

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Burman , J , Malmberg , L P , Remes , S , Jartti , T , Pelkonen , A S & Makela , M J 2021 , ' Impulse oscillometry and free-running tests for diagnosing asthma and monitoring lung function in young children ' , Annals of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology , vol. 127 , no. 3 , pp. 326-333 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2021.03.030

Title: Impulse oscillometry and free-running tests for diagnosing asthma and monitoring lung function in young children
Author: Burman, Janne; Malmberg, Leo Pekka; Remes, Sami; Jartti, Tuomas; Pelkonen, Anna S.; Makela, Mika J.
Contributor organization: University of Helsinki
Department of Dermatology, Allergology and Venereology
HUS Inflammation Center
Date: 2021-09
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Annals of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology
ISSN: 1081-1206
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2021.03.030
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/335671
Abstract: Background: Separating individuals with viral-induced wheezing from those with asthma is challenging, and there are no guidelines for children under 6 years of age. Impulse oscillometry, however, is feasible in 4-year-old children. Objective: To explore the use of impulse oscillometry in diagnosing and monitoring asthma in young children and evaluating treatment response to inhaled corticosteroid (ICS). Methods: A total of 42 children (median age 5.3 years, range 4.0-7.9 years) with physician-diagnosed asthma and lability in oscillometry were followed for 6 months after initiation of ICS treatment. All children performed the 6-minute free-running test and impulse oscillometry at 3 time points. After the baseline, they attended a second visit when they had achieved good asthma control and a third visit approximately 60 days after the second visit. A positive ICS response was defined as having greater than 19 points in asthma control test and no hyperreactivity on the third visit. Results: In total, 38 of 42 children responded to ICS treatment. Exercise-induced increases of resistance at 5 Hz decreased after ICS treatment (61% vs 18% vs 13.5%, P < .001), and running distance during the 6-minute test was lengthened (800 m vs 850 m vs 850 m, P = .001). Significant improvements in childhood asthma control scores occurred between the baseline and subsequent visits (21 vs 24 vs 24, P < .001) and acute physicians' visits for respiratory symptoms (1, (0-6) vs 0, (0-2), P = .001). Similar profiles were observed in children without aeroallergen sensitization and among those under 5 years of age. Conclusion: Impulse oscillometry is a useful tool in diagnosing asthma and monitoring lung function in young children. (C) 2021 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc.
Subject: EXHALED NITRIC-OXIDE
BRONCHIAL HYPERRESPONSIVENESS
CHILDHOOD ASTHMA
SMALL AIRWAYS
METHACHOLINE
RESPONSES
EXERCISE
RISK
BECLOMETHASONE
FLUTICASONE
3121 General medicine, internal medicine and other clinical medicine
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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