Bacterial succession in oil-contaminated soil under phytoremediation with poplars

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/335853

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Lopez-Echartea , E , Strejcek , M , Mukherjee , S , Uhlik , O & Yrjälä , K 2020 , ' Bacterial succession in oil-contaminated soil under phytoremediation with poplars ' , Chemosphere , vol. 243 , 125242 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.125242

Title: Bacterial succession in oil-contaminated soil under phytoremediation with poplars
Author: Lopez-Echartea, Eglantina; Strejcek, Michal; Mukherjee, Shinjini; Uhlik, Ondrej; Yrjälä, Kim
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Laboratory of Aquatic Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences
Date: 2020-03
Language: eng
Number of pages: 12
Belongs to series: Chemosphere
ISSN: 0045-6535
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/335853
Abstract: Petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) continue to be among the most common pollutants in soil worldwide. Phytoremediation has become a sustainable way of dealing with PHC contamination. We conducted the off-site phytoremediation of PHC-polluted soil from an oil tanker truck accident, where poplars were used for the phytoremediation of the oil-polluted soil in a boreal climate during a seven-year treatment. The succession of bacterial communities over the entire phytoremediation process was monitored using microbial ecological tools relying on high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Upon the successful depletion of PHCs from soils, endophytic communities were analyzed in order to assess the complete plant-associated microbiome after the ecological recovery. The rhizosphere-associated soil exhibited different bacterial dynamics than unplanted soil, but both soils had a bacterial community succession through the years, with diversity being negatively correlated with PHC concentration. In the relatively short growing season in North Europe, seasonal variations in environmental conditions were identified that contributed to the dynamics of bacterial communities. Overall, our study proved that phytoremediation using poplar trees can be used to assist in the removal of PHCs from soils in boreal climate conditions and provides new insight into the succession patterns of bacterial communities associated with these plants.
Subject: 1172 Environmental sciences
11832 Microbiology and virology
11831 Plant biology
Phytoremediation
Petroleum hydrocarbons
Bacterial secondary succession
Endophytes
Populus
Bacterial
Secondary succession
MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE
BIODEGRADATION
PETROLEUM
SP NOV.
IMPROVE PHYTOREMEDIATION
POLLUTED SOIL
ENDOPHYTIC BACTERIA
DIESEL
IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION
RHIZOSPHERE
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