SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in solid-organ transplant recipients : What the clinician needs to know

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/335941

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Giannella , M , Pierrotti , L C , Helanterä , I & Manuel , O 2021 , ' SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in solid-organ transplant recipients : What the clinician needs to know ' , Transplant International , vol. 34 , no. 10 , pp. 1776-1788 . https://doi.org/10.1111/tri.14029

Title: SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in solid-organ transplant recipients : What the clinician needs to know
Author: Giannella, Maddalena; Pierrotti, Ligia C.; Helanterä, Ilkka; Manuel, Oriol
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, HUS Abdominal Center

Date: 2021-10
Language: eng
Number of pages: 13
Belongs to series: Transplant International
ISSN: 0934-0874
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/tri.14029
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/335941
Abstract: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, SARS-CoV-2 vaccines have been developed at an unparalleled speed, with 14 SARS-CoV-2 vaccines currently authorized. Solid-organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at risk for developing a higher rate of COVID-19-related complications and therefore they are at priority for immunization against SARS-CoV-2. Preliminary data suggest that although SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are safe in SOT recipients (with similar rate of adverse events than in the general population), the antibody responses are decreased in this population. Risk factors for poor vaccine immunogenicity include older age, shorter time from transplantation, use of mycophenolate and belatacept, and worse allograft function. SOT recipients should continue to be advised to maintain hand hygiene, use of facemasks, and social distancing after SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Vaccination of household contacts should be also prioritized. Although highly encouraged for research purposes, systematic assessment in clinical practice of humoral and cellular immune responses after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination is controversial, since correlation between immunological findings and clinical protection from severe COVID-19, and cutoffs for protection are currently unknown in SOT recipients. Alternative immunization schemes, including a booster dose, higher doses, and modulation of immunosuppression during vaccination, need to be assessed in the context of well-designed clinical trials.
Subject: immunogenicity
mRNA vaccine
organ transplantation
prevention
safety
SARS-CoV-2
KIDNEY-TRANSPLANT
INFLUENZA VACCINATION
T-CELL
COVID-19
RESPONSES
3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology
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