The effect of canopy architecture on the patterning of ‘windflecks’ within a wheat canopy

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/335963

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Burgess , A J , Durand , M , Gibbs , J A , Retkute , R , Robson , T M & Murchie , E H 2021 , ' The effect of canopy architecture on the patterning of ‘windflecks’ within a wheat canopy ' , Plant, Cell and Environment , vol. 44 , no. 11 , pp. 3524-3537 . https://doi.org/10.1111/pce.14168

Title: The effect of canopy architecture on the patterning of ‘windflecks’ within a wheat canopy
Author: Burgess, Alexandra J.; Durand, Maxime; Gibbs, Jonathon A.; Retkute, Renata; Robson, T. Matthew; Murchie, Erik H.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Canopy Spectral Ecology and Ecophysiology
University of Helsinki, Canopy Spectral Ecology and Ecophysiology
Date: 2021-11
Language: eng
Number of pages: 14
Belongs to series: Plant, Cell and Environment
ISSN: 0140-7791
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/335963
Abstract: Under field conditions, plants are subject to wind-induced movement which creates fluctuations of light intensity and spectral quality reaching the leaves, defined here as windflecks. Within this study, irradiance within two contrasting wheat (Triticum aestivum) canopies during full sun conditions was measured using a spectroradiometer to determine the frequency, duration and magnitude of low- to high-light events plus the spectral composition during wind-induced movement. Similarly, a static canopy was modelled using three-dimensional reconstruction and ray tracing to determine fleck characteristics without the presence of wind. Corresponding architectural traits were measured manually and in silico including plant height, leaf area and angle plus biomechanical properties. Light intensity can differ up to 40% during a windfleck, with changes occurring on a sub-second scale compared to similar to 5 min in canopies not subject to wind. Features such as a shorter height, more erect leaf stature and having an open structure led to an increased frequency and reduced time interval of light flecks in the CMH79A canopy compared to Paragon. This finding illustrates the potential for architectural traits to be selected to improve the canopy light environment and provides the foundation to further explore the links between plant form and function in crop canopies.
Subject: Canopy architecture
Light intensity
Photosynthesis
Spectral quality
Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
Windfleck
Wind-induced movement
WATER-USE
FLUCTUATING LIGHT
SUNFLECKS
PHOTOSYNTHETIC ACCLIMATION
wheat (Triticum aestivum)
wind-induced movement
FOREST
LEAF PHOTOSYNTHESIS
spectral quality
light intensity
photosynthesis
CARBON GAIN
STEADY-STATE
IMPACTS
UNDERSTORY
11831 Plant biology
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