Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia vs nurse administered oral oxycodone after total knee arthroplasty : a retrospective cohort study

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/336003

Citation

Lahtinen , K , Reponen , E , Vakkuri , A , Palanne , R , Rantasalo , M , Linko , R , Madanat , R & Skants , N 2021 , ' Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia vs nurse administered oral oxycodone after total knee arthroplasty : a retrospective cohort study ' , Scandinavian journal of pain , vol. 21 , no. 1 , pp. 121-126 . https://doi.org/10.1515/sjpain-2020-0012

Title: Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia vs nurse administered oral oxycodone after total knee arthroplasty : a retrospective cohort study
Author: Lahtinen, Katarina; Reponen, Elina; Vakkuri, Anne; Palanne, Riku; Rantasalo, Mikko; Linko, Rita; Madanat, Rami; Skants, Noora
Contributor organization: Anestesiologian yksikkö
HUS Perioperative, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine
University of Helsinki
Department of Diagnostics and Therapeutics
Clinicum
Department of Surgery
Helsinki University Hospital Area
I kirurgian klinikka (Töölö)
HUS Musculoskeletal and Plastic Surgery
Date: 2021-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 6
Belongs to series: Scandinavian journal of pain
ISSN: 1877-8860
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/sjpain-2020-0012
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/336003
Abstract: Objectives: Severe post-operative pain is common after total knee arthroplasty. Patient-controlled analgesia is an alternative method of pain management, whereby a patient administers his or her own pain medication. Patients seem to prefer this method over nurse-administered analgesia. However, it remains unclear whether patients using patient-controlled analgesia devices use higher or lower doses of opioids compared to patients treated with oral opioids. Methods: This retrospective study examined 164 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Post-operatively, 82 patients received oxycodone via intravenous patient-controlled analgesia devices, while the pain medication for 82 patients in the control group was administered by nurses. The main outcome measure was the consumption of intravenous opioid equivalents within 24 h after surgery. Secondary outcome measures were the use of anti-emetic drugs and the length of stay. Furthermore, we evaluated opioid-related adverse event reports. Results: The consumption of opioids during the first 24 h after surgery and the use of anti-emetic drugs were similar in both groups. The median opioid dose of intravenous morphine equivalents was 41.1 mg (interquartile range (IQR): 29.5-69.1 mg) in the patient-controlled analgesia group and 40.5 mg (IQR: 32.4-48.6 mg) in the control group, respectively. The median length of stay was 2 days (IQR: 2-3 days) in the patient-controlled analgesia group and 3 days (IQR: 2-3 days) in the control group (p=0.02). The use of anti-emetic drugs was similar in both groups. Conclusions: The administration of oxycodone via intravenous patient-controlled analgesia devices does not lead to increased opioid or anti-emetic consumptions compared to nurse-administered pain medication after total knee arthroplasty. Patient-controlled analgesia might lead to shortened length of stay.
Subject: acute pain
opioid use
oxycodone
patient-controlled analgesia
postsurgical pain
total knee arthroplasty
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
REPLACEMENT SURGERY
POSTOPERATIVE PAIN
HOSPITAL STAY
HIP
MORPHINE
TRENDS
LENGTH
SATISFACTION
EFFICACY
3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: unspecified
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
10.1515_sjpain_2020_0012.pdf 202.0Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record