Diffuse solar radiation and canopy photosynthesis in a changing environment

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/336208

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Durand , M , Murchie , E H , Lindfors , A , Urban , O , Aphalo , P J & Robson , T M 2021 , ' Diffuse solar radiation and canopy photosynthesis in a changing environment ' , Agricultural and Forest Meteorology , vol. 311 , 108684 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agrformet.2021.108684

Title: Diffuse solar radiation and canopy photosynthesis in a changing environment
Author: Durand, Maxime; Murchie, Erik H.; Lindfors, Anders; Urban, Otmar; Aphalo, Pedro J.; Robson, T. Matthew
Contributor organization: Canopy Spectral Ecology and Ecophysiology
Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme
Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences
Viikki Plant Science Centre (ViPS)
Plant Biology
Sensory and Physiological Ecology of Plants (SenPEP)
Biosciences
Date: 2021-12-15
Language: eng
Number of pages: 13
Belongs to series: Agricultural and Forest Meteorology
ISSN: 0168-1923
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agrformet.2021.108684
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/336208
Abstract: The sunlight received by plants is affected by cloudiness and pollution. Future changes in cloud cover will differ among regions, while aerosol concentrations are expected to continue increasing globally as a result of wildfires, fossil fuel combustion, and industrial pollution. Clouds and aerosols increase the diffuse fraction and modify the spectral composition of incident solar radiation, and both will affect photosynthesis and terrestrial ecosystem productivity. Thus, an assessment of how canopy and leaf-level processes respond to these changes is needed as part of accurately forecasting future global carbon assimilation. To review these processes and their implications: first, we discuss the physical basis of the effect of clouds and aerosols on solar radiation as it penetrates the atmosphere; second, we consider how direct and diffuse radiation are absorbed and transmitted by plant canopies and their leaves; and finally, we assess the consequences for photosynthesis at the canopy and ecosystem levels. Photobiology will be affected at the atmospheric level by a shift in spectral composition toward shorter or longer wavelengths under clouds or aerosols, respectively, due to different scattering. Changes in the microclimate and spectral composition of radiation due to an enhanced diffuse fraction also depend on the acclimation of canopy architectural and physiological traits, such as leaf area index, orientation, and clumping. Together with an enhancement of light-use efficiency, this makes the effect of diffuse solar radiation on canopy photosynthesis a multilayered phenomenon, requiring experimental testing to capture those complex interactions that will determine whether it produces the persistent enhancement in carbon assimilation that land-surface models currently predict.
Subject: Diffuse radiation
Aerosols
Clouds
Climate change
Spectral composition
Photosynthesis
GROSS PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY
NET ECOSYSTEM EXCHANGE
AEROSOL OPTICAL-PROPERTIES
BIOMASS BURNING AEROSOLS
CARBON-DIOXIDE EXCHANGE
WATER-VAPOR EXCHANGE
ELEVATED CO2
CLIMATE-CHANGE
ATMOSPHERIC PARTICLES
NITROGEN DISTRIBUTION
4111 Agronomy
1171 Geosciences
1172 Environmental sciences
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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