The Paradox of Fiction Revisited—Improvised Fictional and Real-Life Social Rejections Evoke Associated and Relatively Similar Psychophysiological Responses

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/336218

Citation

Seppänen , S , Toivanen , T , Makkonen , T , Jääskeläinen , I P & Tiippana , K 2021 , ' The Paradox of Fiction Revisited—Improvised Fictional and Real-Life Social Rejections Evoke Associated and Relatively Similar Psychophysiological Responses ' , Brain Sciences , vol. 11 , no. 11 , 1463 . https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11111463

Title: The Paradox of Fiction Revisited—Improvised Fictional and Real-Life Social Rejections Evoke Associated and Relatively Similar Psychophysiological Responses
Author: Seppänen, Sirke; Toivanen, Tapio; Makkonen, Tommi; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P.; Tiippana, Kaisa
Contributor organization: Department of Education
Learning, Culture & Interventions (LECI)
Teacher Education
Medicum
Brain, Music and Learning
Cognitive Brain Research Unit
Department of Psychology and Logopedics
Perception Action Cognition
Date: 2021-11-05
Language: eng
Number of pages: 25
Belongs to series: Brain Sciences
ISSN: 2076-3425
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11111463
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/336218
Abstract: Theatre-based practices, such as improvisation, are frequently applied to simulate everyday social interactions. Although the improvisational context is acknowledged as fictional, realistic emotions may emerge, a phenomenon labelled the ‘paradox of fiction’. This study investigated how manipulating the context (real-life versus fictional) modulates psychophysiological reactivity to social rejection during dyadic interactions. We measured psychophysiological responses elicited during real-life (interview) and fictional (improvisation exercises) social rejections. We analysed the heart rate (HR), skin conductance, facial muscle activity, and electrocortical activity (electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha asymmetry) of student teachers (N = 39) during various social rejections (devaluing, interrupting, nonverbal rejection). All social rejections evoked negative EEG alpha asymmetry, a measure reflecting behavioural withdrawal motivation. Psychophysiological responses during real-life and fictional rejections correlated, and rejection type modified the responses. When comparing responses across all rejection types, facial muscle activity and EEG alpha asymmetry did not differ between real-life and fictional rejections, whereas HR decelerated and skin conductance increased during fictional rejections. These findings demonstrate that regardless of cognitive awareness of fictionality, relatively subtle social rejections elicited psychophysiological reactivity indicating emotional arousal and negative valence. These findings provide novel, biological evidence for the application of theatre-based improvisation to studying experientially everyday social encounters. Keywords: improvisation; social rejection; theatre-based practices; experiential learning; paradox of fiction; social interaction
Subject: 516 Educational sciences
515 Psychology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
brainsci_11_01463.pdf 2.507Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record