Cryogenic land surface processes shape vegetation biomass patterns in northern European tundra

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/336294

Citation

Aalto , J , Niittynen , P , Riihimaki , H & Luoto , M 2021 , ' Cryogenic land surface processes shape vegetation biomass patterns in northern European tundra ' , Communications earth & environment , vol. 2 , no. 1 , 222 . https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-021-00292-7

Title: Cryogenic land surface processes shape vegetation biomass patterns in northern European tundra
Author: Aalto, Juha; Niittynen, Pekka; Riihimaki, Henri; Luoto, Miska
Contributor organization: Institute of Biotechnology (-2009)
Department of Geosciences and Geography
Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
BioGeoClimate Modelling Lab
Date: 2021-10-19
Language: eng
Number of pages: 10
Belongs to series: Communications earth & environment
ISSN: 2662-4435
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-021-00292-7
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/336294
Abstract: Tundra ecosystems have experienced changes in vegetation composition, distribution, and productivity over the past century due to climate warming. However, the increase in above-ground biomass may be constrained by cryogenic land surface processes that cause topsoil disturbance and variable microsite conditions. These effects have remained unaccounted for in tundra biomass models, although they can impact multiple opposing feedbacks between the biosphere and atmosphere, ecosystem functioning and biodiversity. Here, by using field-quantified data from northern Europe, remote sensing, and machine learning, we show that cryogenic land surface processes substantially constrain above-ground biomass in tundra. The three surveyed processes (cryoturbation, solifluction, and nivation) collectively reduced biomass by an average of 123.0 g m(-2) (-30.0%). This effect was significant over landscape positions and was especially pronounced in snowbed environments, where the mean reduction in biomass was 57.3%. Our results imply that cryogenic land surface processes are pivotal in shaping future patterns of tundra biomass, as long as cryogenic ground activity is retained by climate warming. Vegetation in tundra ecosystems is constrained by cryogenic land surface processes, despite the fact that models of future biomass changes rarely take these into account, according to field and remote sensing data from northern Europe.
Subject: ICE-WEDGE DEGRADATION
CLIMATE-CHANGE
ARCTIC VEGETATION
FEEDBACKS
EQUATIONS
DYNAMICS
IMPACTS
PERFORMANCE
DISTURBANCE
PERMAFROST
1172 Environmental sciences
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
s43247_021_00292_7.pdf 2.105Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record