Historical shifts in local attitudes towards wildlife by Maasai pastoralists of the Amboseli Ecosystem (Kenya): insights from three conservation psychology theories

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Fernández-Llamazares , Á , Western , D , Galvin , K A , McElwee , P & Cabeza , M 2020 , ' Historical shifts in local attitudes towards wildlife by Maasai pastoralists of the Amboseli Ecosystem (Kenya): insights from three conservation psychology theories ' , Journal for Nature Conservation , vol. 53 , 125763 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnc.2019.125763

Title: Historical shifts in local attitudes towards wildlife by Maasai pastoralists of the Amboseli Ecosystem (Kenya): insights from three conservation psychology theories
Author: Fernández-Llamazares, Álvaro; Western, David; Galvin, Kathleen A.; McElwee, Pamela; Cabeza, Mar
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme
University of Helsinki, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Date: 2020-02
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Journal for Nature Conservation
ISSN: 1617-1381
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/336470
Abstract: Local attitudes towards wildlife encompass environmental, political, sociocultural and psychological dimensions that shape human-wildlife interactions and conservation efforts. Although the political and sociocultural dimensions of these interactions have been extensively examined by political ecologists and cultural anthropologists, psychological aspects have remained largely untapped so far. This article presents an in-depth review of a long historical record of changing attitudes towards wildlife among Maasai pastoralists of the Amboseli Ecosystem in southern Kenya, examining their shifts in light of different conservation psychology theories. The historical changes are reviewed in relation to three theories of attitudinal shifts (i.e., cognitive dissonance, reactance, and motivation crowding theory) and discussed in a context of land dispossession, conservation policies and changes in Maasai lifestyles and cultural values. We conclude that conservation psychology adds an important dimension to understanding attitudes towards wildlife and how they bear on conservation policies and practices.
Subject: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
1172 Environmental sciences
cognitive dissonance
conservation psychology
crowding out
human-wildlife conflict
intrinsic motivation
reactance
CONFLICT
PAYMENTS
BEHAVIOR
BIOSPHERE RESERVE
INCENTIVES
POLITICAL ECOLOGY
ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES
AFRICAN
PEOPLE
PERCEPTIONS
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