Orthostatic Hypotension is a Risk Factor for Falls Among Older Adults : 3-Year Follow-Up

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/336494

Citation

Hohtari-Kivimaki , U , Salminen , M , Vahlberg , T & Kivelä , S-L 2021 , ' Orthostatic Hypotension is a Risk Factor for Falls Among Older Adults : 3-Year Follow-Up ' , Journal of the American Medical Directors Association , vol. 22 , no. 11 , pp. 2325-2330 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2021.07.010

Title: Orthostatic Hypotension is a Risk Factor for Falls Among Older Adults : 3-Year Follow-Up
Author: Hohtari-Kivimaki, Ulla; Salminen, Marika; Vahlberg, Tero; Kivelä, Sirkka-Liisa
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Divisions of Faculty of Pharmacy

Date: 2021-11
Language: eng
Number of pages: 6
Belongs to series: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association
ISSN: 1525-8610
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2021.07.010
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/336494
Abstract: Objectives: To assess the prevalence of orthostatic hypotension (OH) and the association of OH with the risk of falls among community-dwelling older adults with a previous fall. Design: Longitudinal study. Setting and Participants: The subjects (n = 561) were participants in fall prevention conducted in western Finland. Methods: Blood pressure (BP) was measured in supine position and at 30 seconds and 3 minutes after standing. The participants were divided according to the consensus definition to an OH group (OHG) and a non-OH group (non-OHG). Falls were recorded by fall diaries during 12 months. Falls requiring treatment were gathered from health center and hospital registers during 12 and 36 months. Results: The prevalence of OH was 23.4% (30 seconds) and 7.3% (3 minutes). The 30-second measurement showed that the incidence of falls and that of falls requiring treatment were significantly higher in OHG compared with non-OHG during 12 months. After adjustments, the incidence of falls remained higher in all 5 adjusted models whereas that of falls requiring treatment remained higher only after adjustment for functional balance. The 3-minute measurement showed that the incidence of falls was higher in OHG compared with non-OHG during 12 months and remained higher after adjustments for functional balance and for age and functional balance. During the 36-month follow-up, OH measured at 30 seconds or 3 minutes after standing was not associated with the occurrence of falls leading to treatment. Conclusions and Implications: OH at 30 seconds or 3 minutes after standing is associated with a greater risk for falling within 12 months in older adults. The 30-second blood pressure measurement is more reliable to detect the risk than the 3-minute measurement. The results support the usability of 30-second measurement in determining OH and the risk for falling among older persons. (C) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine.
Subject: Older adults
orthostatic hypotension
fall
BERG BALANCE SCALE
ELDERLY POPULATION
ASSOCIATION
MEDICATIONS
PREVENTION
DIAGNOSIS
PEOPLE
3111 Biomedicine
317 Pharmacy
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
1_s2.0_S1525861021006484.pdf 298.1Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record