Stronger proprioceptive BOLD-responses in the somatosensory cortices reflect worse sensorimotor function in adolescents with and without cerebral palsy

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Nurmi , T , Jaatela , J , Vallinoja , J , Mäenpää , H & Piitulainen , H 2021 , ' Stronger proprioceptive BOLD-responses in the somatosensory cortices reflect worse sensorimotor function in adolescents with and without cerebral palsy ' , NeuroImage: Clinical , vol. 32 , 102795 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2021.102795

Title: Stronger proprioceptive BOLD-responses in the somatosensory cortices reflect worse sensorimotor function in adolescents with and without cerebral palsy
Author: Nurmi, Timo; Jaatela, Julia; Vallinoja, Jaakko; Mäenpää, Helena; Piitulainen, Harri
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, HUS Children and Adolescents
University of Helsinki, HUS Children and Adolescents


Date: 2021
Language: eng
Number of pages: 15
Belongs to series: NeuroImage: Clinical
ISSN: 2213-1582
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2021.102795
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/336558
Abstract: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a motor disorder where the motor defects are partly due to impaired proprioception. We studied cortical proprioceptive responses and sensorimotor performance in adolescents with CP and their typically-developed (TD) peers. Passive joint movements were used to stimulate proprioceptors during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session to quantify the proprioceptive responses whose associations to behavioral sensorimotor performance were also examined. Twenty-three TD (15 females, age: mean +/- standard deviation 14.2 +/- 2.4 years) and 18 CP (12 females, age: mean +/- standard deviation, 13.8 +/- 2.3 years; 12 hemiplegic, 6 diplegic) participants were included in this study. Participants' index fingers and ankles were separately stimulated at 3 Hz and 1 Hz respectively with pneumatic movement actuators. Regions-of-interest were used to quantify BOLD-responses from the primary sensorimotor (SM1) and secondary (SII) somatosensory cortices and were compared across the groups. Associations between responses strengths and sensorimotor performance measures were also examined. Proprioceptive responses were stronger for the individuals with CP compared to their TD peers in SM1 (p < 0.001) and SII (p < 0.05) cortices contralateral to their more affected index finger. The ankle responses yielded no significant differences between the groups. The CP group had worse sensorimotor performance for hands and feet (p < 0.001). Stronger responses to finger stimulation in the dominant SM1 (p < 0.001) and both dominant and non-dominant SII (p < 0.01, p < 0.001) cortices were associated with the worse hand sensorimotor performance across all participants. Worse hand function was associated with stronger cortical activation to the proprioceptive stimulation. This association was evident both in adolescents with CP and their typically-developed controls, thus it likely reflects both clinical factors and normal variation in the sensorimotor function. The specific mechanisms need to be clarified in future studies.
Subject: Passive movement
SM1
SII
Kinesthesia
Hemiplegia
Diplegia
AGE-RELATED DIFFERENCES
MOTOR CORTEX
PASSIVE FINGER
TACTILE STIMULATION
GABA CONCENTRATION
EVOKED-POTENTIALS
CHILDREN
MOVEMENT
BRAIN
ORGANIZATION
3112 Neurosciences
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
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