Ex-Vivo Adhesion of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium to the Intestinal Mucosa of Healthy Beagles

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Hanifeh, M.; Spillmann, T.; Huhtinen, M.; Sclivagnotis, Y.S.; Grönthal, T.; Hynönen, U. Ex-Vivo Adhesion of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium to the Intestinal Mucosa of Healthy Beagles. Animals 2021, 11, 3283.

Title: Ex-Vivo Adhesion of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium to the Intestinal Mucosa of Healthy Beagles
Author: Hanifeh, Mohsen; Spillmann, Thomas; Huhtinen, Mirja; Sclivagnotis, Yannes S.; Grönthal, Thomas; Hynönen, Ulla
Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Date: 2021-11-16
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/336754
Abstract: Some <i>Enterococcus faecalis</i> and <i>E. faecium</i> strains are used as probiotics or feed additives. Adherence to the intestinal mucosa is considered a crucial step for intestinal bacteria to colonize and further interact with the host epithelium and the immune system. In dogs, there are no studies investigating the adhesion of <i>E. faecalis</i> and <i>E. faecium</i> to paraffin-embedded intestinal mucosa. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the adhesion of <i>E. faecalis</i> and <i>E. faecium</i> to the intestinal mucosa of six healthy beagles using bacteria derived from dogs and chickens. In addition, we aimed to validate a method to test the adhesion of Alexa Fluor-labeled bacteria to paraffin-embedded canine intestinal mucosa. The results of our study show that both canine- and chicken-derived <i>E. faecalis</i> strains adhered significantly better than <i>E. faecium</i> to the duodenal mucosa of healthy beagles (<i>p</i> = 0.002). In addition, canine <i>E. faecalis</i> and <i>E. faecium</i> adhered in higher numbers to canine duodenal mucosa, compared to chicken-derived strains of the same species (<i>p</i> = 0.015 for <i>E. faecalis</i> and <i>p</i> = 0.002 for <i>E. faecium</i>). The determination of the hydrophobicity of bacteria revealed that canine <i>E. faecalis</i> had the highest hydrophobicity level (36.6%), followed by chicken <i>E. faecalis</i> (20.4%), while canine <i>E. faecium</i> (5.7%) and chicken <i>E. faecium</i> (4.5%) had the lowest levels. Our results suggest that both the bacterial species and the host origin of the strain may influence mucosal adhesion.


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