Parental care amplifies changes in offspring production in a disturbed environment

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Candolin , U , Goncalves , S & Pant , P 2021 , ' Parental care amplifies changes in offspring production in a disturbed environment ' , Oikos , vol. 130 , no. 12 , pp. 2231-2238 . https://doi.org/10.1111/oik.08668

Title: Parental care amplifies changes in offspring production in a disturbed environment
Author: Candolin, Ulrika; Goncalves, Sara; Pant, Pankaj
Contributor organization: Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme
Biosciences
Behavioural Ecology - Candolin Research Lab
Date: 2021-12
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Oikos
ISSN: 0030-1299
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/oik.08668
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/336984
Abstract: Recruitment is usually negatively density-dependent with fewer offspring surviving when more are produced. Parental care could alter the pattern as behaviours that maximize individual fitness are not necessarily adaptive at the population level. We manipulated the number of eggs spawned into the nests of male threespine stickleback, and found egg survival to be positively density-dependent. This reversed negative density-dependent survival observed in the absence of parental care. The reversal was caused my males investing more in parental care when receiving more eggs, while favouring future reproductive opportunities when receiving few eggs. Density-dependent parental care thus amplified changes in offspring production in relation to number of eggs spawned. Such amplification may occur in disturbed environments where human activities have altered female fecundity and males may receive more or less eggs than expected. The optimal balancing between present and future parental investment can then be distorted, resulting in maladaptive parental behaviour that reduces offspring survival. These results suggest that behaviours that have evolved to maximize individual fitness under pristine conditions can become mal-adaptive under disturbed conditions and influence the recruitment of offspring into a population. Considering that human activities are rapidly transforming environments, such mal-adaptive behavioural responses could be common and magnify negative effects of human activities on population dynamics.
Subject: BEHAVIORAL-RESPONSES
CONSERVATION
COVER
FILIAL CANNIBALISM
FISH
MULTIPLE
PREDATION RISK
SURVIVAL
VALENCIENNEA-LONGIPINNIS
early-life effects
fecundity
hatching success
parental effects
recruitment
reproduction
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: unspecified
Usage restriction: closedAccess
Self-archived version: submittedVersion


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