Persistently High Levels of Maternal Antenatal Inflammation Are Associated With and Mediate the Effect of Prenatal Environmental Adversities on Neurodevelopmental Delay in the Offspring

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Girchenko , P , Lahti-Pulkkinen , M , Heinonen , K , Reynolds , R M , Laivuori , H , Lipsanen , J , Villa , P , Hämäläinen , E , Kajantie , E , Lahti , J & Räikkönen , K 2020 , ' Persistently High Levels of Maternal Antenatal Inflammation Are Associated With and Mediate the Effect of Prenatal Environmental Adversities on Neurodevelopmental Delay in the Offspring ' , Biological Psychiatry , vol. 87 , no. 10 , pp. 898-907 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2019.12.004

Title: Persistently High Levels of Maternal Antenatal Inflammation Are Associated With and Mediate the Effect of Prenatal Environmental Adversities on Neurodevelopmental Delay in the Offspring
Author: Girchenko, Polina; Lahti-Pulkkinen, Marius; Heinonen, Kati; Reynolds, Rebecca M.; Laivuori, Hannele; Lipsanen, Jari; Villa, Pia; Hämäläinen, Esa; Kajantie, Eero; Lahti, Jari; Räikkönen, Katri
Contributor organization: Department of Psychology and Logopedics
Developmental Psychology Research Group
Behavioural Sciences
HUS Gynecology and Obstetrics
Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland
Pregnancy and Genes
Genomics of Neurological and Neuropsychiatric Disorders
Teachers' Academy
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Medicum
HUSLAB
HUS Children and Adolescents
Clinicum
Lastentautien yksikkö
Children's Hospital
Date: 2020-05-15
Language: eng
Number of pages: 10
Belongs to series: Biological Psychiatry
ISSN: 0006-3223
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2019.12.004
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/337380
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Prenatal exposure to environmental adversities, including maternal overweight/obesity, diabetes/ hypertensive disorders, or mood/anxiety disorders, increases the risk for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in children. However, the underlying biological mechanisms remain elusive. We tested whether maternal antenatal inflammation was associated with the number of neurodevelopmental delay areas in children and whether it mediated the association between exposure to any prenatal environmental adversity and child neurodevelopmental delay. METHODS: Mother-child dyads (N = 418) from the PREDO (Prediction and Prevention of Preeclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction) study were followed up to 10.8 years. We analyzed maternal plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and glycoprotein acetyls at 3 consecutive antenatal time points, measured maternal body mass index in early pregnancy, extracted data on diabetes/hypertensive disorders in pregnancy from medical records, and extracted data on mood/anxiety disorders until childbirth from the Care Register for Health Care. To estimate the number of neurodevelopmental delay areas in children across cognitive, motor, and social functioning, we pooled data from the Care Register for Health Care on psychological development disorders with mother-reported Ages and Stages Questionnaire data on developmental milestones. RESULTS: Higher levels of maternal high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and glycoprotein acetyls at and across all 3 antenatal time points were associated with 1.30- to 2.36-fold (p values, CONCLUSIONS: Higher levels of maternal inflammation, especially when persisting throughout pregnancy, increase a child's risk of neurodevelopmental delay and mediate the effect of prenatal environmental adversity on child neurodevelopmental delay.
Subject: 515 Psychology
Inflammation
Mediation
Neurodevelopmental delay
Offspring
Pregnancy
Prenatal adversity
C-REACTIVE PROTEIN
IMMUNE ACTIVATION
HS-CRP
RISK
PREGNANCY
DEPRESSION
OBESITY
AUTISM
FETAL
HOSPITALIZATION
Peer reviewed: Yes
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: acceptedVersion


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