Mental, Physical and Social Functioning in Independently Living Senior House Residents and Community-Dwelling Older Adults

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Lahti , A-M , Mikkola , T M , Salonen , M , Wasenius , N , Sarvimäki , A , Eriksson , J G & von Bonsdorff , M B 2021 , ' Mental, Physical and Social Functioning in Independently Living Senior House Residents and Community-Dwelling Older Adults ' , International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , vol. 18 , no. 23 , 12299 . https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312299

Title: Mental, Physical and Social Functioning in Independently Living Senior House Residents and Community-Dwelling Older Adults
Author: Lahti, Anna-Maria; Mikkola, Tuija M.; Salonen, Minna; Wasenius, Niko; Sarvimäki, Anneli; Eriksson, Johan G.; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B.
Contributor organization: Clinicum
Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care
Helsinki University Hospital Area
Research Programs Unit
Johan Eriksson / Principal Investigator
Date: 2021-12
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ISSN: 1661-7827
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312299
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/338622
Abstract: Senior houses provide social interaction and support, potentially supporting older people's physical and mental functioning. Few studies have investigated functioning of senior house residents. The aim was to compare functioning between senior house residents and community-dwelling older adults in Finland. We compared senior house residents (n = 336, 69% women, mean age 83 years) to community-dwelling older adults (n = 1139, 56% women, mean age 74 years). Physical and mental functioning were assessed using the SF 36-Item Health Survey. Loneliness and frequency of social contacts were self-reported. The analyses were adjusted for age, socioeconomic factors and diseases. Physical functioning was lower among men in senior houses compared to community-dwelling men (mean 41.1 vs. 46.4, p = 0.003). Mental functioning or the frequency of social contacts did not differ between type of residence in either sex. Loneliness was higher among women in senior houses compared to community-dwelling women (OR = 1.67, p = 0.027). This was not observed in men. Results suggest that women in senior houses had similar physical and mental functioning compared to community-dwelling women. Male senior house residents had poorer physical functioning compared to community-dwelling men. Women living in senior houses were lonelier than community-dwelling women despite the social environment.
Subject: mental functioning
older people
physical functioning
loneliness
senior housing
social contacts
CLINICALLY IMPORTANT DIFFERENCES
HEALTH-STATUS
SF-36
LIFE
LONELINESS
PEOPLE
RETIREMENT
SUPPORT
BIRTH
3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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