Are Dogs Altering Microbial Communities and Contributing to Antibiotic Resistance in Urban Park Soil Bacteria?

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/339552

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Allen , J & Zheng , B-X 2021 , ' Are Dogs Altering Microbial Communities and Contributing to Antibiotic Resistance in Urban Park Soil Bacteria? ' , People and Planet – From Theory to Solutions 8th to 10th of November 2021, Online from the European Green Capital 2021 Lahti, Finland , Lahti , Finland , 08/11/2021 - 10/11/2021 pp. 1 .

Title: Are Dogs Altering Microbial Communities and Contributing to Antibiotic Resistance in Urban Park Soil Bacteria?
Author: Allen, John; Zheng, Bang-Xiao
Contributor organization: Urban Ecosystems
Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme
Date: 2021-11-10
Language: eng
Number of pages: 1
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URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/339552
Abstract: Parks and other green spaces are important parts of the urban landscape, providing residents with valuable ecosystem services. Many urban residents visit parks or other types of green space with their dogs on a daily basis, and dog waste is a common problem in these areas. The environmental and health impacts of dogs' left-behind solid waste has been and continues to be studied. However, the impacts of dog urine have received essentially no close attention, and its effects in urban areas are not well understood. Dogs are required to be kept on leashes in public spaces in Finland, and most of their urine has been found to be concentrated along walking paths. Since dogs are commonly treated for infections and other illnesses, these same areas are likely receiving sporadic, low-level doses of antibiotics. This highly localized and chronic deposition of residual antibiotics in areas used for human recreation and leisure represents a uniquely urban phenomenon. In this study we have analysed soil DNA extracts from Helsinki and Lahti greenspaces using SmartChip qPCR Analysis. We found elevated numbers of ARG copies in areas impacted by dog urine versus control sites. Further analysis will be needed to determine the significance of this effect, but the results suggest that dogs are contributing to the development of antibiotic resistance urban park soil bacteria.
Subject: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
dogs (Canis familiaris)
Urban
urban ecosystem
greenspace management
Greenspace planning
Green areas
Soil bacteria
1182 Biochemistry, cell and molecular biology
antibiotics
antibiotic resistance (AR)
ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE
Peer reviewed: No
Rights: cc_by_sa
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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