Land-use intensity affects the potential for apparent competition within and between habitats

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/340226

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Miller , K E , Aguilera , G , Bommarco , R & Roslin , T 2021 , ' Land-use intensity affects the potential for apparent competition within and between habitats ' , Journal of Animal Ecology , vol. 90 , no. 8 , pp. 1891-1905 . https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.13508

Title: Land-use intensity affects the potential for apparent competition within and between habitats
Author: Miller, Kirsten E.; Aguilera, Guillermo; Bommarco, Riccardo; Roslin, Tomas
Contributor organization: Department of Agricultural Sciences
Spatial Foodweb Ecology Group
Date: 2021-08
Language: eng
Number of pages: 15
Belongs to series: Journal of Animal Ecology
ISSN: 0021-8790
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.13508
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/340226
Abstract: Arthropod communities dwelling in adjacent habitats are able to impact one another via shared natural enemies. In agricultural landscapes, drastic differences in resource availability between crop and non-crop habitats cause variation in insect herbivore densities over short distances, potentially driving inter-habitat effects. Moreover, the composition of the landscape in which the habitats are embedded likely affects realised attack rates from natural enemies via impacts on local arthropod community structure. Here, we examine indirect effects between herbivore species within and between habitat types by calculating the potential for apparent competition between multiple populations. Firstly, we aim to determine how disparities in resource availability impact the strength of the potential for apparent competition occurring between habitats, secondly to examine the impact of landscape composition upon these effects, and finally to couch these observations in reality by investigating the link between the potential for apparent competition and realised attack rates. We used DNA metabarcoding to characterise host-parasitoid interactions within two habitat types (with divergent nutrient inputs) at 11 locations with variable landscape composition within an agroecosystem context. We then used these interaction networks to estimate the potential for apparent competition between each host pair and to compare expected versus realised attack rates across the system. Shared natural enemies were found to structure host herbivore communities within and across habitat boundaries. The size of this effect was related to the resource availability of habitats, such that the habitat with high nutrient input exerted a stronger effect. The overall potential for apparent competition declined with increasing land-use intensity in the surrounding landscape and exhibited a discernible impact on realised attack rates upon herbivore species. Thus, our results suggest that increasing the proportion of perennial habitat in agroecosystems could increase the prevalence of indirect effects such as apparent competition among insect herbivore communities, potentially leading to enhanced population regulation via increased attack rates from natural enemies like parasitoid wasps.
Subject: apparent competition
ecological networks
host–parasitoid
parasitoid
indirect effects
landscape composition
metabarcoding
PREDATOR-PREY INTERACTIONS
QUANTITATIVE FOOD WEBS
AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPE
COMMUNITY STRUCTURE
ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION
PEST-CONTROL
BIODIVERSITY
SPILLOVER
ABUNDANCE
POLLINATION
1172 Environmental sciences
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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