Overweight and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction - Is there a link?

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/340333

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Malmberg , M , Malmberg , L P , Pelkonen , A S , Makela , M J & Kotaniemi-Syrjänen , A 2021 , ' Overweight and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction - Is there a link? ' , Pediatric Allergy and Immunology , vol. 32 , no. 5 , pp. 992-998 . https://doi.org/10.1111/pai.13492

Title: Overweight and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction - Is there a link?
Author: Malmberg, Maiju; Malmberg, L. Pekka; Pelkonen, Anna S.; Makela, Mika J.; Kotaniemi-Syrjänen, Anne
Contributor organization: Faculty of Medicine
HUS Inflammation Center
Department of Dermatology, Allergology and Venereology
Doctoral Programme in Clinical Research
University Management
Date: 2021-07
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
ISSN: 0905-6157
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/pai.13492
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/340333
Abstract: Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of body mass index with regard to exercise performance, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), and respiratory symptoms in 7- to 16-year-old children. Methods A total of 1120 outdoor running exercise challenge test results of 7- to 16-year-old children were retrospectively reviewed. Lung function was evaluated with spirometry, and exercise performance was assessed by calculating distance per 6 minutes from the running time and distance. Respiratory symptoms in the exercise challenge test were recorded, and body mass index modified for children (ISO-BMI) was calculated for each child from height, weight, age, and gender according to the national growth references. Results Greater ISO-BMI and overweight were associated with poorer exercise performance (P <.001). In addition, greater ISO-BMI was independently associated with cough (P = .002) and shortness of breath (P = .012) in the exercise challenge. However, there was no association between ISO-BMI and EIB or with wheeze during the exercise challenge. Conclusion Greater ISO-BMI may have a role in poorer exercise performance and appearance of respiratory symptoms during exercise, but not in EIB in 7- to 16-year-old children.
Subject: asthma
BMI
cough
exercise&#8208
induced bronchoconstriction
pediatrics
physical fitness
shortness of breath
wheeze
CAPACITY
RESPONSIVENESS
LUNG-FUNCTION
CHILDHOOD
CHILDREN
OBESITY
AIRWAY
ASTHMA
RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS
WEIGHT
3121 General medicine, internal medicine and other clinical medicine
3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by_nc_nd
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: acceptedVersion


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