Education as a moderator of middle-age cardiovascular risk factor-old-age cognition relationships : testing cognitive reserve hypothesis in epidemiological study

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/341289

Citation

Iso-Markku , P , Kaprio , J , Lindgren , N , Rinne , J O & Vuoksimaa , E 2022 , ' Education as a moderator of middle-age cardiovascular risk factor-old-age cognition relationships : testing cognitive reserve hypothesis in epidemiological study ' , Age and Ageing , vol. 51 , no. 2 , 228 . https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afab228

Title: Education as a moderator of middle-age cardiovascular risk factor-old-age cognition relationships : testing cognitive reserve hypothesis in epidemiological study
Author: Iso-Markku, Paula; Kaprio, Jaakko; Lindgren, Noora; Rinne, Juha O.; Vuoksimaa, Eero
Contributor organization: HUS Medical Imaging Center
Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland
HUS Diagnostic Center
Department of Diagnostics and Therapeutics
Helsinki Institute of Life Science HiLIFE
Department of Public Health
Cognitive and Brain Aging
Faculty Common Matters
Date: 2022-02-02
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Age and Ageing
ISSN: 0002-0729
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afab228
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/341289
Abstract: Background higher educational attainment and less midlife cardiovascular risk factors are related to better old-age cognition. Whether education moderates the association between cardiovascular risk factors and late-life cognition is not known. We studied if higher education provides resilience against the deteriorative effects of higher middle-age body mass index (BMI) and a combination of midlife cardiovascular risk factors on old-age cognition. Methods the study population is the older Finnish Twin Cohort (n = 4,051, mean age [standard deviation, SD] = 45.5 years [6.5]). Cardiovascular risk factors and education were studied at baseline with questionnaires in 1975, 1981 and/or 1990 (participation rates of 89, 84 and 77%, respectively). Cognition was evaluated with telephone interviews (participation rate 67%, mean age [SD] =73.4 [2.9] years, mean follow-up [SD] = 27.8 [6.0] years) in 1999-2017. We studied the main and interactive effects of education and BMI/dementia risk score on late-life cognition with linear regression analysis. The study design was formulated before the pre-defined analyses. Results years of education moderated the association between BMI with old-age cognition (among less educated persons, BMI-cognition association was stronger [B = -0.24 points per BMI unit, 95% CI -0.31, -0.18] than among more educated persons [B = -0.06 points per BMI unit, 95% CI -0.16, 0.03], P-interaction < 0.01). There was a similar moderating effect of education on dementia risk score consisting of cardiovascular risk factors (P < 0.001). Conclusions our results support the cognitive reserve hypothesis. Those with higher education may tolerate the deteriorative effects of midlife cardiovascular risk factors on old-age cognition better than those with lower education.
Subject: Cognition
cardiovascular risk
education
twins
resilience
older people
DEMENTIA RISK
3121 General medicine, internal medicine and other clinical medicine
3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
afab228.pdf 517.2Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record