Disentangling national and religious identification as predictors of support for religious minority rights among Christian majority groups

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Eskelinen , V , Renvik , T A , Pauha , T , Jetten , J , Kunst , J , van der Noll , J , Rohmann , A & Jasinskaja-Lahti , I 2022 , ' Disentangling national and religious identification as predictors of support for religious minority rights among Christian majority groups ' , British Journal of Social Psychology , vol. 61 , no. 2 , pp. 550-568 . https://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12496

Title: Disentangling national and religious identification as predictors of support for religious minority rights among Christian majority groups
Author: Eskelinen, Viivi; Renvik, Tuuli Anna; Pauha, Teemu; Jetten, Jolanda; Kunst, Jonas; van der Noll, Jolanda; Rohmann, Anette; Jasinskaja-Lahti, Inga
Contributor organization: Social Psychology
Social Psychologists Studying Intergroup Relations (ESSO)
Open University
Faculty Common Matters
Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
Helsinki Inequality Initiative (INEQ)
Faculty of Theology
Faculty of Theology
Date: 2022-04
Language: eng
Number of pages: 19
Belongs to series: British Journal of Social Psychology
ISSN: 0144-6665
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12496
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/343071
Abstract: It is often assumed that, in Western societies, Christian values are embedded in national identities, yet, the association between religious identities and prejudice has seldom been studied in parallel to national identity. According to both the social identity theory approach and integrated threat theory, group identification is important for perceiving threats and expressing corresponding attitudes. Nevertheless, their independent roles on intergroup outcomes have often been ignored, although they are two of the most salient and important identities when considering support for religious minority rights. We address this gap in research by looking at the associations of religious identity with support for religious minority rights in general and Muslims in particular in parallel to national identity through diversity threat. This study was conducted among the members of majority groups in four Western countries: Australia, Finland, Germany, and Norway (N = 1,532), all of which are characterised as traditionally Christian. We found that a higher religious identification was associated with greater support for religious minority rights in general and for those of Muslims in particular, while national identification had no direct association with support for either groups' religious rights. However, both group identifications were also associated with heightened perceived diversity threat, which in turn, predicted reluctance to support religious minority rights. This demonstrates the dual role that religious identities may play in intergroup relations.
Subject: diversity threat
national identity
religious identity
support for religious minority rights
MUSLIM IMMIGRANTS
ANTI-MUSLIM
THREAT PERCEPTION
PREJUDICE
ATTITUDES
IDENTITY
EUROPE
ISLAM
CONTACT
SELF
5144 Social psychology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by_nc_nd
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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