Gut microbiome and health : mechanistic insights

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/343689

Citation

de Vos , W M , Tilg , H , Van Hul , M & Cani , P D 2022 , ' Gut microbiome and health : mechanistic insights ' , Gut , vol. 71 , no. 5 , pp. 1020-1032 . https://doi.org/10.1136/gutjnl-2021-326789

Title: Gut microbiome and health : mechanistic insights
Author: de Vos, Willem M.; Tilg, Herbert; Van Hul, Matthias; Cani, Patrice D.
Contributor organization: Department of Bacteriology and Immunology
Willem Meindert Vos de / Principal Investigator
de Vos & Salonen group
HUMI - Human Microbiome Research
Date: 2022-05
Language: eng
Number of pages: 13
Belongs to series: Gut
ISSN: 0017-5749
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/gutjnl-2021-326789
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/343689
Abstract: The gut microbiota is now considered as one of the key elements contributing to the regulation of host health. Virtually all our body sites are colonised by microbes suggesting different types of crosstalk with our organs. Because of the development of molecular tools and techniques (ie, metagenomic, metabolomic, lipidomic, metatranscriptomic), the complex interactions occurring between the host and the different microorganisms are progressively being deciphered. Nowadays, gut microbiota deviations are linked with many diseases including obesity, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis, intestinal bowel diseases (IBDs) and several types of cancer. Thus, suggesting that various pathways involved in immunity, energy, lipid and glucose metabolism are affected. In this review, specific attention is given to provide a critical evaluation of the current understanding in this field. Numerous molecular mechanisms explaining how gut bacteria might be causally linked with the protection or the onset of diseases are discussed. We examine well-established metabolites (ie, short-chain fatty acids, bile acids, trimethylamine N-oxide) and extend this to more recently identified molecular actors (ie, endocannabinoids, bioactive lipids, phenolic-derived compounds, advanced glycation end products and enterosynes) and their specific receptors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha) and gamma (PPAR gamma), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and G protein-coupled receptors (ie, GPR41, GPR43, GPR119, Takeda G protein-coupled receptor 5). Altogether, understanding the complexity and the molecular aspects linking gut microbes to health will help to set the basis for novel therapies that are already being developed.
Subject: intestinal microbiology
obesity
intestinal barrier function
liver
probiotics
CHAIN FATTY-ACIDS
GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE-1
BILE-SALT BIOTRANSFORMATIONS
INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA
INSULIN SENSITIVITY
FECAL MICROBIOTA
BARRIER FUNCTION
METABOLIC SYNDROME
STIMULATES GLP-1
RESISTANT STARCH
3121 General medicine, internal medicine and other clinical medicine
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
1020.full.pdf 2.123Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record