Longitudinal associations between third-grade teaching styles and sixth-grade reading skills : a 3-year follow-up study

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/345526

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Tang , X , Kikas , E , Pakarinen , E , Laursen , B & Lerkkanen , M-K 2022 , ' Longitudinal associations between third-grade teaching styles and sixth-grade reading skills : a 3-year follow-up study ' , Journal of Research in Reading , vol. 45 , no. 1 , pp. 157-169 . https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12385

Title: Longitudinal associations between third-grade teaching styles and sixth-grade reading skills : a 3-year follow-up study
Author: Tang, Xin; Kikas, Eve; Pakarinen, Eija; Laursen, Brett; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina
Contributor organization: Department of Education
Minds Hub
Date: 2022-02
Language: eng
Number of pages: 13
Belongs to series: Journal of Research in Reading
ISSN: 0141-0423
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12385
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/345526
Abstract: Background Most previous studies of teaching styles and reading skills have been cross-sectional. Longitudinal research is needed to clarify the direction of effects. The present longitudinal study examined the degree to which differences in teaching styles in the third grade predict the sixth-grade reading performance. The consistency of the findings was addressed by comparing results across students in two countries (Finland and Estonia). Methods A total of 1,057 students (50.9% boys) were followed from the third to sixth grade. Teaching styles of third-grade teachers (N = 70) were examined as predictors of the development of reading (i.e., third-grade to sixth-grade reading fluency and comprehension). Results Five patterns of third-grade teaching practices were found across two countries: child-centred style, teacher-directed style, child-dominated style, extreme child-centred style, and mixed child-centred and teacher-directed style (mixed teaching style). The mixed teaching style and the child-centred style in the third grade were related to the greatest increases in reading fluency from the third to sixth grade, over and above the contribution of age, gender and maternal education. Conclusions The findings underscore the importance of the flexible use of child-centred and teacher-directed practices, which are both linked to the development of reading fluency during late primary school years.
Subject: 1ST-GRADE
ACHIEVEMENT
CHILDREN
CLASSROOM
DIFFERENCE
EMOTIONAL SUPPORT
ENVIRONMENT
INSTRUCTION
PROFILES
PROGRAM
early teaching effects
elementary students
reading comprehension
reading development
teaching styles
516 Educational sciences
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by_nc
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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