Climatic stability, not average habitat temperature, determines thermal tolerance of subterranean beetles

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/345766

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Colado , R , Pallarés , S , Fresneda , J , Mammola , S , Rizzo , V & Sánchez-Fernández , D 2022 , ' Climatic stability, not average habitat temperature, determines thermal tolerance of subterranean beetles ' , Ecology , vol. 103 , no. 4 , e3629 . https://doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3629

Title: Climatic stability, not average habitat temperature, determines thermal tolerance of subterranean beetles
Author: Colado, Raquel; Pallarés, Susana; Fresneda, Javier; Mammola, Stefano; Rizzo, Valeria; Sánchez-Fernández, David
Contributor organization: Finnish Museum of Natural History
Date: 2022-04
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Ecology
ISSN: 0012-9658
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3629
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/345766
Abstract: The climatic variability hypothesis predicts the evolution of species with wide thermal tolerance ranges in environments with variable temperatures, and the evolution of thermal specialists in thermally stable environments. In caves, the extent of spatial and temporal thermal variability experienced by taxa decreases with their degree of specialization to deep subterranean habitats. We use phylogenetic generalized least squares to model the relationship among thermal tolerance (upper lethal limits), subterranean specialization (estimated using ecomorphological traits), and habitat temperature in 16 beetle species of the tribe Leptodirini (Leiodidae). We found a significant, negative relationship between thermal tolerance and the degree of subterranean specialization. Conversely, habitat temperature had only a marginal effect on lethal limits. In agreement with the climatic variability hypothesis and under a climate change context, we show that the specialization process to live in deep subterranean habitats involves a reduction of upper lethal limits, but not an adjustment to habitat temperature. Thermal variability seems to exert a higher evolutionary pressure than mean habitat temperature to configure the thermal niche of subterranean species. Our results provide novel insights on thermal physiology of species with poor dispersal capabilities and on the evolutionary process of adaptation to subterranean environments. We further emphasize that the pathways determining vulnerability of subterranean species to climate change greatly depend on the degree of specialization to deep subterranean environments.
Subject: BIODIVERSITY
CAVE
EVOLUTION
EXTINCTION
GRADIENT
HYPOTHESIS
IMPACTS
Leiodidae
RANGE
SENSITIVITY
VULNERABILITY
cave fauna
climate change
climatic variability hypothesis
deep subterranean environment
habitat temperature
mountain passes hypothesis
thermal tolerance
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: unspecified
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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