Social-ecological connections across land, water, and sea demand a reprioritization of environmental management

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Gladstone-Gallagher , R , Tylianakis , J M , Yletyinen , J , Dakos , V , Douglas , E J , Greenhalgh , S , Hewitt , J E , Hikuroa , D , Lade , S J , Le Heron , R , Norkko , A , Perry , G L W , Pilditch , C A , Schiel , D , Siwicka , E , Warburton , H & Thrush , S F 2022 , ' Social-ecological connections across land, water, and sea demand a reprioritization of environmental management ' , Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene , vol. 10 , no. 1 . https://doi.org/10.1525/elementa.2021.00075

Title: Social-ecological connections across land, water, and sea demand a reprioritization of environmental management
Author: Gladstone-Gallagher, Rebecca; Tylianakis, Jason M.; Yletyinen, Johanna; Dakos, Vasilis; Douglas, Emily J.; Greenhalgh, Suzie; Hewitt, Judi E.; Hikuroa, Daniel; Lade, Steven J.; Le Heron, Richard; Norkko, Alf; Perry, George L. W.; Pilditch, Conrad A.; Schiel, David; Siwicka, Ewa; Warburton, Helen; Thrush, Simon F.
Contributor organization: Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme
Tvärminne Benthic Ecology Team
Marine Ecosystems Research Group
Tvärminne Zoological Station
Biological stations
Date: 2022-06-08
Language: eng
Number of pages: 18
Belongs to series: Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene
ISSN: 2325-1026
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1525/elementa.2021.00075
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/345958
Abstract: Despite many sectors of society striving for sustainability in environmental management, humans often fail to identify and act on the connections and processes responsible for social-ecological tipping points. Part of the problem is the fracturing of environmental management and social-ecological research into ecosystem domains (land, freshwater, and sea), each with different scales and resolution of data acquisition and distinct management approaches. We present a perspective on the social-ecological connections across ecosystem domains that emphasize the need for management reprioritization to effectively connect these domains. We identify critical nexus points related to the drivers of tipping points, scales of governance, and the spatial and temporal dimensions of social-ecological processes. We combine real-world examples and a simple dynamic model to illustrate the implications of slow management responses to environmental impacts that traverse ecosystem domains. We end with guidance on management and research opportunities that arise from this cross-domain lens to foster greater opportunity to achieve environmental and sustainability goals.
Subject: Cross-domain
Cumulative effects
Ecosystem-based management
Hilltops to ocean
Tipping points
FRESH-WATER
CLIMATE-CHANGE
ALLOCHTHONOUS INPUT
WETLAND MANAGEMENT
REGIME SHIFTS
NEW-ZEALAND
MARINE
SCALE
RESILIENCE
ECOSYSTEMS
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
1172 Environmental sciences
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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