Impact of in-field soil heterogeneity on biomass and yield of winter triticale in an intensively cropped hummocky landscape under temperate climate conditions

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Habib-ur-Rahman , M , Raza , A , Ahrends , H E , Huging , H & Gaiser , T 2022 , ' Impact of in-field soil heterogeneity on biomass and yield of winter triticale in an intensively cropped hummocky landscape under temperate climate conditions ' , Precision agriculture , vol. 23 , pp. 912-938 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s11119-021-09868-x

Title: Impact of in-field soil heterogeneity on biomass and yield of winter triticale in an intensively cropped hummocky landscape under temperate climate conditions
Author: Habib-ur-Rahman, Muhammad; Raza, Ahsan; Ahrends, Hella Ellen; Huging, Hubert; Gaiser, Thomas
Contributor organization: Department of Agricultural Sciences
Agrotechnology
Date: 2022-06
Language: eng
Number of pages: 27
Belongs to series: Precision agriculture
ISSN: 1385-2256
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11119-021-09868-x
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/346050
Abstract: Crop cultivation provides ecosystem services on increasingly large fields. However, the effects of in-field spatial heterogeneity on crop yields, in particular triticale, have rarely been considered. The study assess the effects of in-field soil heterogeneity and elevation on triticale grown in an intensively cropped hummocky landscape. The field was classified into three soil classes: C1, C2, and C3, based on soil texture and available water capacity (AWC), which had high, moderate, and low yield potential, respectively. Three elevations (downslope (DS), midslope (MS), and upslope (US)) were considered as the second study factor. An unbalanced experimental design was adopted with a factorial analysis of variance for data analysis. Temporal growth analysis showed that soil classes and elevation had significant effects. Generally, better growth was observed in C1 compared to that of C3. DS had a lower yield potential than that of MS and US. In addition, the interactive effect was confirmed, as triticale had poor growth and yield in C3 on the DS, but not on US. Crop physiological parameters also confirmed the differences between soil classes and elevation. Similarly, soil moisture (SM) content in the plow layer measured at different points in time and AWC over the soil profile had a positive association with growth and yield. The results confirmed that spatial differences in AWC and SM can explain spatial variability in growth and yield. The mapping approach combining soil auguring techniques with a digital elevation model could be used to subdivide fields in hummocky landscapes for determining sub-field input intensities to guide precision farming.
Subject: Precision resource management
Soil texture
SOM
Available water capacity
DEM
Stomatal conductance and transpiration rate
ORGANIC-MATTER
GRAIN-YIELD
MANAGEMENT ZONES
TOPOGRAPHIC PROPERTIES
SPATIAL HETEROGENEITY
TEMPORAL VARIABILITY
WHEAT
NITROGEN
CARBON
CORN
4111 Agronomy
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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