Sustainability Science as a Management Science : Beyond the Natural-Social Divide

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/346524

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Nagatsu , M & Thorén , H 2021 , Sustainability Science as a Management Science : Beyond the Natural-Social Divide . in D Ludwig , I Koskinen , Z Mncube , L Poliseli & L Reyes-Garcia (eds) , Global Epistemologies and Philosophies of Science . History and Philosophy of Biology , Routledge , London , pp. 92-105 . https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003027140

Title: Sustainability Science as a Management Science : Beyond the Natural-Social Divide
Author: Nagatsu, Michiru; Thorén, Henrik
Other contributor: Ludwig, David
Koskinen, Inkeri
Mncube, Zinhle
Poliseli, Luana
Reyes-Garcia, Luis
Contributor organization: Practical Philosophy
Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
TINT – Centre for Philosophy of Social Science
Doctoral Programme in Interdisciplinary Environmental Sciences
Staff Services
Publisher: Routledge
Date: 2021-07-30
Language: eng
Number of pages: 14
Belongs to series: Global Epistemologies and Philosophies of Science
Belongs to series: History and Philosophy of Biology
ISBN: 978-0-367-46137-9
978-1-032-04263-3
978-1-003-02714-0
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003027140
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/346524
Abstract: In this chapter, we argue that in order to understand the interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary dialectics in sustainability science, it is useful to see sustainability science as a kind of management science, and then to highlight the hard-soft distinction in systems thinking. First, we argue that the commonly made natural-social science dichotomy is relatively unimportant and unhelpful. We then outline the differences between soft and hard systems thinking as a more relevant and helpful distinction, mainly as a difference between perspectives in systemic modeling toward models. We also illustrate that the distinction is methodologically useful to advance sustainability science by enabling us (i) to suggest novel ways of using existing theoretical, experimental, and computational resources of the sciences for renewable resource management, and (ii) to disentangle disciplinary disagreements in climate science.
Subject: 611 Philosophy
Peer reviewed: Yes
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: acceptedVersion


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