Differences in Thermal Tolerance between Parental Species Could Fuel Thermal Adaptation in Hybrid Wood Ants

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Martin-Roy , R , Nygard , E , Nouhaud , P & Kulmuni , J 2021 , ' Differences in Thermal Tolerance between Parental Species Could Fuel Thermal Adaptation in Hybrid Wood Ants ' , American Naturalist , vol. 198 , no. 2 , pp. 278-294 . https://doi.org/10.1086/715012

Title: Differences in Thermal Tolerance between Parental Species Could Fuel Thermal Adaptation in Hybrid Wood Ants
Author: Martin-Roy, Raphael; Nygard, Elisa; Nouhaud, Pierre; Kulmuni, Jonna
Contributor organization: Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme
Evolution, Sociality & Behaviour
Tvärminne Zoological Station
Date: 2021-08-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 17
Belongs to series: American Naturalist
ISSN: 0003-0147
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1086/715012
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/346537
Abstract: Genetic variability is essential for adaptation and could be acquired via hybridization with a closely related lineage. We use ants to investigate thermal adaptation and the link between temperature and genetic variation arising from hybridization. We test for differences in cold and heat tolerance between Finnish Formica polyctena and Formica aquilonia wood ants and their naturally occurring hybrids. Using workers, we find that the parental individuals differ in both cold and heat tolerances and express thermal limits that reflect their global distributions. Hybrids, however, cannot combine thermal tolerance of parental species as they have the same heat tolerance as F. polyctena but not the same cold tolerance as F. aquilonia. We then focus on a single hybrid population to investigate the relationship between temperature variation and genetic variation across 16 years using reproductive individuals. On the basis of the thermal tolerance results, we expected the frequency of putative F. polyctena alleles to increase in warm years and F. aquilonia alleles to increase in cold years. We find support for this in hybrid males but not in hybrid females. These results contribute to understanding the outcomes of hybridization, which may be sex specific or depend on the environment. Furthermore, genetic variability resulting from hybridization could help hybrid wood ants cope with changing thermal conditions.
Subject: hybridization
haplodiploidy
adaptive potential
temperature tolerance
climate change
fitness
ADAPTIVE INTROGRESSION
COLD RESISTANCE
CLIMATE-CHANGE
RANGE SHIFTS
HYBRIDIZATION
DROSOPHILA
TEMPERATURE
DISTRIBUTIONS
SEGREGATION
COEXISTENCE
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: unspecified
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: acceptedVersion


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