Post-stroke enriched auditory environment induces structural connectome plasticity : secondary analysis from a randomized controlled trial

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/346647

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Sihvonen , A J , Soinila , S & Sarkamo , T 2022 , ' Post-stroke enriched auditory environment induces structural connectome plasticity : secondary analysis from a randomized controlled trial ' , Brain Imaging and Behavior , vol. 16 , no. 4 , pp. 1813-1822 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s11682-022-00661-6

Title: Post-stroke enriched auditory environment induces structural connectome plasticity : secondary analysis from a randomized controlled trial
Author: Sihvonen, Aleksi J.; Soinila, Seppo; Sarkamo, Teppo
Contributor organization: Doctoral Programme in Clinical Research
Cognitive Brain Research Unit
Department of Psychology and Logopedics
Brain, Music and Learning
University of Helsinki
Centre of Excellence in Music, Mind, Body and Brain
Music, Ageing and Rehabilitation Team
Date: 2022-08
Language: eng
Number of pages: 10
Belongs to series: Brain Imaging and Behavior
ISSN: 1931-7557
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11682-022-00661-6
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/346647
Abstract: Post-stroke neuroplasticity and cognitive recovery can be enhanced by multimodal stimulation via environmental enrichment. In this vein, recent studies have shown that enriched sound environment (i.e., listening to music) during the subacute post-stroke stage improves cognitive outcomes compared to standard care. The beneficial effects of post-stroke music listening are further pronounced when listening to music containing singing, which enhances language recovery coupled with structural and functional connectivity changes within the language network. However, outside the language network, virtually nothing is known about the effects of enriched sound environment on the structural connectome of the recovering post-stroke brain. Here, we report secondary outcomes from a single-blind randomized controlled trial (NCT01749709) in patients with ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke (N = 38) who were randomly assigned to listen to vocal music, instrumental music, or audiobooks during the first 3 post-stroke months. Utilizing the longitudinal diffusion-weighted MRI data of the trial, the present study aimed to determine whether the music listening interventions induce changes on structural white matter connectome compared to the control audiobook intervention. Both vocal and instrumental music groups increased quantitative anisotropy longitudinally in multiple left dorsal and ventral tracts as well as in the corpus callosum, and also in the right hemisphere compared to the audiobook group. Audiobook group did not show increased structural connectivity changes compared to both vocal and instrumental music groups. This study shows that listening to music, either vocal or instrumental promotes wide-spread structural connectivity changes in the post-stroke brain, providing a fertile ground for functional restoration.
Subject: Music
Environmental enrichment
Stroke
Rehabilitation
Structural connectivity
INCREASES ACTIVITY
STROKE RECOVERY
NEURAL REPAIR
BRAIN
MUSIC
REHABILITATION
UNIT
NEUROPLASTICITY
PERCEPTION
MECHANISMS
515 Psychology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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