Freezing induces an increase in leaf spectral transmittance of forest understorey and alpine forbs

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Solanki , T , García-Plazaola , J I , Robson , T M & Fernandez-Marin , B 2022 , ' Freezing induces an increase in leaf spectral transmittance of forest understorey and alpine forbs ' , Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences , vol. 21 , pp. 997-1009 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s43630-022-00189-0

Title: Freezing induces an increase in leaf spectral transmittance of forest understorey and alpine forbs
Author: Solanki, Twinkle; García-Plazaola, José Ignacio; Robson, T Matthew; Fernandez-Marin, Beatriz
Contributor organization: Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme
Biosciences
Canopy Spectral Ecology and Ecophysiology
Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences
Date: 2022-06
Language: eng
Number of pages: 13
Belongs to series: Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences
ISSN: 1474-905X
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s43630-022-00189-0
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/346702
Abstract: Evergreen plants growing at high latitudes or high elevations may experience freezing events in their photosynthetic tissues. Freezing events can have physical and physiological effects on the leaves which alter leaf optical properties affecting remote and proximal sensing parameters. We froze leaves of six alpine plant species (Soldanella alpina, Ranunculus kuepferi, Luzula nutans, Gentiana acaulis, Geum montanum, and Centaurea uniflora) and three evergreen forest understorey species (Hepatica nobilis, Fragaria vesca and Oxalis acetosella), and assessed their spectral transmittance and optically measured pigments, as well as photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) as an indicator of freezing damage. Upon freezing, leaves of all the species transmitted more photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and some species had increased ultraviolet-A (UV-A) transmittance. These differences were less pronounced in alpine than in understorey species, which may be related to higher chlorophyll degradation, visible as reduced leaf chlorophyll content upon freezing in the latter species. Among these understorey forbs, the thin leaves of O. acetosella displayed the largest reduction in chlorophyll (−79%). This study provides insights into how freezing changes the leaf optical properties of wild plants which could be used to set a baseline for upscaling optical reflectance data from remote sensing. Changes in leaf transmittance may also serve to indicate photosynthetic sufficiency and physiological tolerance of freezing events, but experimental research is required to establish this functional association.
Subject: ARCTIC EVERGREENS
Extreme climatic events
FROST-RESISTANCE
Frozen leaves
GROWING-SEASON
ICE NUCLEATION
LEAVES
Leaf optical properties
Leaf pigments
OPTICAL-PROPERTIES
PHOTOSYNTHESIS
PLANTS
Photoprotection
SEXUAL REPRODUCTION
Spectral reflectance
WINTER WARMING EVENTS
11831 Plant biology
1184 Genetics, developmental biology, physiology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: unspecified
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: acceptedVersion


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