Labour Mobility and Informality : Romanian Migrants in Spain and Ethnic Entrepreneurs in Croatia

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/346725

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Polese , A , Fradejas-Garcia , I , Banovic , R S , Skokic , V , Kerikmae , T , Luis Molina , J , Alpeza , M , Lubbers , M J & Camerani , A 2022 , ' Labour Mobility and Informality : Romanian Migrants in Spain and Ethnic Entrepreneurs in Croatia ' , Politics and Governance , vol. 10 , no. 2 , pp. 279-292 . https://doi.org/10.17645/pag.v10i2.5166

Title: Labour Mobility and Informality : Romanian Migrants in Spain and Ethnic Entrepreneurs in Croatia
Author: Polese, Abel; Fradejas-Garcia, Ignacio; Banovic, Ruzica Simic; Skokic, Vlatka; Kerikmae, Tanel; Luis Molina, Jose; Alpeza, Mirela; Lubbers, Miranda J.; Camerani, Alberica
Contributor organization: Aleksanteri Institute - Finnish Centre for Russian and East European Studies
Date: 2022
Language: eng
Number of pages: 14
Belongs to series: Politics and Governance
ISSN: 2183-2463
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17645/pag.v10i2.5166
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/346725
Abstract: Post-Weberian definitions see the state???individual relationship as a ???do ut des??? one. The state grants protection, education, medical care, and its citizens contribute labour, compliance, and taxes. When this does not occur, it is generally accepted that the citizens are deviating from state goals. However, there are cases where lack of compliance stems from the fact that society members do not feel protected by formal structures, and they rely on informal ones to replace, supplement, or even compete with state institutions. The starting point of this article is that this lack of support may result from enhanced labour mobility (and migration) across Europe, and may enhance the creation and persistence of informal practices. Taking advantage of two case studies, Romanian migrants to Spain and ethnic entrepreneurs in Croatia, we observe how governance is constructed and provide two novel interpretative frameworks. First, we explore the use of informality (informal practices) to suggest that apparently insignificant actions that are repeated routinely and without much thought, are a way to contribute to the construction of the political and that everyday governance should receive more attention. Second, we use this claim to argue that a better understanding of informality can help identify governance areas where interventions are more urgent. These are the spheres of public life where it is possible to identify a larger gap between the wishes of a state and the ways citizens actually act as they informally avoid or bypass its rules.
Subject: Croatia
informality
labour mobility
Spain
welfare
WELFARE STATES
NETWORKS
RUSSIA
TRANSFORMATION
INSTITUTIONS
POLICIES
IMPACT
5171 Political Science
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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