Browsing Asiantuntijatarkastetut julkaisut - Refereed publications by Subject "microphysical properties"

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  • Tiitta, Petri; Leskinen, Ari; Kaikkonen, Ville A.; Molkoselkä, Eero O.; Mäkynen, Anssi J.; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Calderon, Silvia; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Komppula, Mika (Copernicus publications, 2022)
    Atmospehric measurement techniques
    Upon a new measurement technique, it is possible to sharpen the determination of microphysical properties of cloud droplets using high resolving power imaging. The shape, size, and position of each particle inside a welldefined, three-dimensional sample volume can be measured with holographic methods without assumptions of particle properties. In situ cloud measurements were carried out at the Puijo station in Kuopio, Finland, focusing on intercomparisons between cloud droplet analyzers over 2 months in September–November 2020. The novel holographic imaging instrument (ICEMET) was adapted to measure microphysical properties of liquid clouds, and these values were compared with parallel measurements of a cloud droplet spectrometer (FM-120) and particle measurements using a twininlet system. When the intercomparison was carried out during isoaxial sampling, our results showed good agreement in terms of variability between the instruments, with the averaged ratios between ICEMET and FM-120 being 0.6 ± 0.2, 1.0 ± 0.5, and 1.2 ± 0.2 for the total number concentration (Nd) of droplets, liquid water content (LWC), and median volume diameter (MVD), respectively. This agreement during isoaxial sampling was also confirmed by mutual correlation and Pearson correlation coefficients. The ICEMETobserved LWC was more reliable than FM-120 (without a swivel-head mount), which was verified by comparing the estimated LWC to measured values, whereas the twin-inlet DMPS system and FM-120 observations of Nd showed good agreement both in variability and amplitude. Field data revealed that ICEMET can detect small cloud droplets down to5 µm via geometric magnification.