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  • Haapala, Sini; Niemitalo-Haapola, Elina; Raappana, Antti; Kujala, Tiia; Suominen, Kalervo; Jansson-Verkasalo, Eira; Kujala, Teija (BioMed Central, 2016)
    Abstract Background A large group of young children are exposed to repetitive middle ear infections but the effects of the fluctuating hearing sensations on immature central auditory system are not fully understood. The present study investigated the consequences of early childhood recurrent acute otitis media (RAOM) on involuntary auditory attention switching. Methods By utilizing auditory event-related potentials, neural mechanisms of involuntary attention were studied in 22–26 month-old children (N = 18) who had had an early childhood RAOM and healthy controls (N = 19). The earlier and later phase of the P3a (eP3a and lP3a) and the late negativity (LN) were measured for embedded novel sounds in the passive multi-feature paradigm with repeating standard and deviant syllable stimuli. The children with RAOM had tympanostomy tubes inserted and all the children in both study groups had to have clinically healthy ears at the time of the measurement assessed by an otolaryngologist. Results The results showed that lP3a amplitude diminished less from frontal to central and parietal areas in the children with RAOM than the controls. This might reflect an immature control of involuntary attention switch. Furthermore, the LN latency was longer in children with RAOM than in the controls, which suggests delayed reorientation of attention in RAOM. Conclusions The lP3a and LN responses are affected in toddlers who have had a RAOM even when their ears are healthy. This suggests detrimental long-term effects of RAOM on the neural mechanisms of involuntary attention.
  • Wright, Elizabeth; Fischbach, Michel; Zaloszyc, Ariane; Paglialonga, Fabio; Aufricht, Christoph; Dufek, Stephanie; Bakkaloglu, Sevcan; Klaus, Gunter; Zurowska, Aleksandra; Ekim, Mesiha; Ariceta, Gema; Hölttä, Tuula; Jankauskiene, Augustina; Schmitt, Claus Peter; Stefanidis, Constantinos J.; Walle, Johan Vande; Vondrak, Karel; Edefonti, Alberto; Shroff, Rukshana; Working, European Paediat Dialysis (Springer, 2016)
  • Vartia, Olli S.; Ylä-Oijala, Pasi; Markkanen, Johannes; Puupponen, Salla; Seppälä, Ari; Sihvola, Ari; Ala-Nissila, Tapio (PERGAMON, 2016)
    It has been recognized that the commonly used discrete dipole approximation (DDA) for calculating the optical properties of plasmonic materials may exhibit slow convergence for a certain region of the complex refractive index. In this work we investigate the quantitative accuracy of DDA for particles of different shapes, with silver as the plasmonic material. As expected, the accuracy and convergence of the method as a function of the number of dipoles is relatively good for solid spheres and rounded cubes whose size is of the same order as the wavelength of the localized surface plasmon resonance in silver. However, we find that for solid particles much smaller than the resonance wavelength, and for silver-silica core-shell particles in particular, DDA does not converge to the correct limit even for 10(6) dipoles. We also find that the slow convergence tends to be accompanied by strong, discretization dependent oscillations in the particle's internal electric field. We demonstrate that the main factor behind the slow convergence of the DDA is due to inaccuracies in the plasmonic resonances of the dipoles at the surface of the particles. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Heinonen, Jussi S.; Luttinen, Arto V.; Bohrson, Wendy A. (Springer, 2016)
    Continental flood basalts (CFBs) represent large-scale melting events in the Earth’s upper mantle and show considerable geochemical heterogeneity that is typically linked to substantial contribution from underlying continental lithosphere. Large-scale partial melting of the cold subcontinental lithospheric mantle and the large amounts of crustal contamination suggested by traditional binary mixing or assimilation-fractional crystallization models are difficult to reconcile with the thermal and compositional characteristics of continental lithosphere,however. The well-exposed CFBs of Vestfjella, western Dronning Maud Land,Antarctica, belong to the Jurassic Karoo large igneous province and provide a prime locality to quantify mass contributions of lithospheric and sublithospheric sources for two reasons: 1) recently discovered CFB dikes show isotopic characteristics akin to mid-ocean ridge basalts, and thus help to constrain asthenospheric parental melt compositions, and 2) the well-exposed basaltic lavas have been divided into four different geochemical magma types that exhibit considerable trace element and radiogenic isotope heterogeneity (e.g., initial εNd from-16 to +2 at 180 Ma). We simulate the geochemical evolution of Vestfjella CFBs using 1) energy-constrained assimilation-fractional crystallization equations that account for heating and partial melting of crustal wallrock and 2)assimilation-fractional crystallization equations for lithospheric mantle contamination by using highly alkaline continental volcanic rocks (i.e. partial melts of mantle lithosphere) as contaminants. Calculations indicate that the different magma types can be produced by just minor (1–15 wt. %) contamination of asthenospheric parental magmas by melts from variable lithospheric reservoirs. Our models imply that the role of continental lithosphere as a CFB source component or contaminant may have been overestimated in many cases. Thus, CFBs may represent major juvenile crustal growth events rather than just recycling of old lithospheric materials.
  • Niemi, Pia-Maria; Hotulainen, Risto (Consortia Academia Publishing, 2016)
  • Kantele, Anu; Siikamäki, Heli; Virolainen-Julkunen, Anni; Keistinen, Timo (Suomalainen lääkäririseura Duodecim, 2016)
  • Kantele, Anu; Mero, Sointu; Kirveskari, Juha; Lääveri, Tinja (National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2016)
  • Pylkkänen, Paavo; Hiley, Basil; Pättiniemi, Ilkka (Oxford University Press, 2016)
    Ladyman and Ross (LR) 2007 argue that quantum objects are not individuals (or are at most weakly discernible individuals) and use this idea to ground their metaphysical view, ontic structural realism, according to which relational structures are primary to things. LR ac- knowledge that there is a version of quantum theory, namely the Bohm theory (BT), according to which particles do have definite trajectories at all times (Bohm 1952; Bohm and Hiley 1993). This would suggest that quantum particles are individuals after all, with position being the property in virtue of which particles are always different from one another. However, LR refer to research by Brown et al. (1996) which they interpret as saying that in BT, the properties normally associated with particles (mass, charge, etc.) are inherent only in the quantum field and not in the particles (in BT it is assumed that a particle is always accompanied by a quantum field). It would then seem that there is nothing there in the trajectories unless one assumes the ex- istence of some “raw stuff” of the particle. In other words it seems that haecceities are needed for the individuality of particles of BT, and LR dismiss this as idle metaphysics. In this paper we point out, fol- lowing Brown et al.(1996, 1999) that it is reasonable to assume that in BT properties such as mass and charge also reside in the particles (the principle of generosity). Thus, if BT is correct, quantum objects might be individuals after all. However, we move on to emphasize that Bohmian quantum individuals, while in some ways similar to classical particles, also differ from these radically. We will discuss this issue in the light of new developments in the underlying mathematical struc- tures, due to de Gosson and Hiley. In particular, we will show how the mathematical structure of the double cover of the underlying symme- try groups help to understand the relation between classical dynamics and quantum dynamics, as well as the similarities and differences be- tween classical and quantum individuals. We conclude that while BT enables us to retain the notion of individuals in non-relativistic quan- tum theory, these individuals are very different from those of classical physics. It is likely that they can be best understood in the context of a structuralist, process-oriented view, such as Bohm and Hiley’s broader implicate order framework. Thus, while we think that the prospects of individuality in quantum theory are stronger than what LR imply, we agree with them that structuralist considerations are important in fundamental physics more generally.
  • Wilskman, Juho (Finnish Society for Byzantine Studies, 2015)
    This article aims to cast more light on the relatively under-researched subject of warfare in late Byzantine and Frankish Greece by analysing the descriptions of military operations between the Byzantine Empire and the Crusader Principality of Achaia in Morea (the Peloponnese) in 1264, especially the battle of Makry-Plagi. Moreover, it will demonstrate that, although relations between the Latins, Byzantines, and even the Turks were generally hostile at this time, these groups could co-operate to a surprising extent, and even showed a readiness for peaceful co-existence.
  • Häggman, Johanna; Junni, Reijo; Simojoki, Heli; Juga, Jarmo; Soveri, Timo (BioMed Central, 2015)
    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to provide detailed herd level cost information about an outbreak of interdigital phlegmon (IP), which has been an emerging problem with enlarged loose house barns in Finland in recent years. During enlargement, the farmer’s financial situation is sensitive because of the large investments to the farm business and unexpected costs can risk the farm’s survival. Results The University of Helsinki research herd and three commercial herds having outbreaks of IP in 2012 or 2013 were visited to collect detailed information about the costs and economic impact of the outbreaks. The majority of the costs came from the discarded milk due to the antibiotic treatments. In Finland IP is usually treated with parental benzylpenicillin for 5 days which result in discarded milk for a total of 11 days. Third generation cephalosporins, widely used in other countries, have no milk withdrawal time. However, the use of these antibiotics is not recommended in Finland since these antimicrobials are critically important for human health. Herd-level costs varied between 4560 and 28,386 € depending on the herd size, the frequency of the infected cows, the antibiotics used and other costs involved. The average cost per infected cow was 489 €. Conclusions The outbreaks of IP cause severe economic losses to dairy farms and the costs are lower if cows are treated with antibiotics with no withdrawal time. However, other costs, such as involuntary culling, reduced production and fertility also produce substantial costs to the farms. Early detection of sick animals, rapid treatment and control measures to limit the outbreak of IP can lower the costs. Because of the high costs farms should concentrate on preventing the disease.
  • Kovalchuk, Andriy; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis; Asiegbu, Fred O (BioMed Central, 2015)
    Abstract Background Transporter proteins are predicted to have an important role in the mycorrhizal symbiosis, due to the fact that this type of an interaction between plants and fungi requires a continuous nutrient and signalling exchange. ABC transporters are one of the large groups of transporter proteins found both in plants and in fungi. The crucial role of plant ABC transporters in the formation of the mycorrhizal symbiosis has been demonstrated recently. Some of the fungal ABC transporter-encoding genes are also induced during the mycorrhiza formation. However, no experimental evidences of the direct involvement of fungal ABC transporters in this process are available so far. To facilitate the identification of fungal ABC proteins with a potential role in the establishment of the mycorrhizal symbiosis, we have performed an inventory of the ABC protein-encoding genes in the genomes of 25 species of mycorrhiza-forming fungi. Results We have identified, manually annotated and curated more than 1300 gene models of putative ABC protein-encoding genes. Out of those, more than 1000 models are predicted to encode functional proteins, whereas about 300 models represent gene fragments or putative pseudogenes. We have also performed the phylogenetic analysis of the identified sequences. The sets of ABC proteins in the mycorrhiza-forming species were compared to the related saprotrophic or plant-pathogenic fungal species. Our results demonstrate the high diversity of ABC genes in the genomes of mycorrhiza-forming fungi. Via comparison of transcriptomics data from different species, we have identified candidate groups of ABC transporters that might have a role in the process of the mycorrhiza formation. Conclusions Results of our inventory will facilitate the identification of fungal transporters with a role in the mycorrhiza formation. We also provide the first data on ABC protein-coding genes for the phylum Glomeromycota and for orders Pezizales, Atheliales, Cantharellales and Sebacinales, contributing to the better knowledge of the diversity of this protein family within the fungal kingdom.
  • Barreto, Goncalo; Soininen, Antti; Ylinen, Pekka; Sandelin, Jerker; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Nordström, Dan C; Eklund, Kari K (BioMed Central, 2015)
    Abstract Background Soluble biglycan (sBGN) and soluble decorin (sDCN), are two closely related essential components of extracellular matrix which both have been shown to possess proinflammatory properties. We studied whether sBGN or sDCN were present in synovial fluid (SF) of osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and studied sBGN or sDCN potential role in the degradation of OA cartilage. Methods SF obtained from meniscus tear, OA, and RA patients were analysed for sBGN and sDCN using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. OA chondrocytes and cartilage explants were stimulated for 48 h with 5 μg/ml sBGN or 1 μg/ml lipopolysaccharide. Messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), proteinases and cartilage matrix molecules were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cytokines were measured using Luminex xMap technology. Production of nitric oxide (NO), release of proteoglycans and soluble collagen were measured from conditioned culture media using biochemical assays. OA cartilage explant proteoglycans were stained for Safranin O and quantified using image analysis. TLR4 activation by sBGN and sDCN was studied in engineered HEK-293 cells with TLR4 signalling genes inserted together with a reporter gene. Results sBGN was found in meniscus tear SF (14 ± 2 ng/ml), OA SF (582 ± 307 ng/ml) and RA SF (1191 ± 482 ng/ml). Low levels of sDCN could also be detected in SF of meniscus tear (51 ± 4) ng/ml, OA (52 ± 3 ng/ml), and RA (49 ± 4 ng/ml). Stimulation of chondrocytes with sBGN increased significantly the mRNA and protein expression of catabolic MMPs, including MMP1, MMP9 and MMP13, and of inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, whereas the expression of anabolic markers aggrecan and collagen type II was decreased. sBGN induced release of proteoglycans, collagen and NO from chondrocytes and cartilage explants. The catabolic response in explants was dependent of OA cartilage degradation stage. The mechanism of action of sBGN was mainly mediated through the TLR4-nuclear factor-κB pathway. Conclusions High levels of sBGN was found in advanced OA and RA SF. sBGN activates chondrocytes mainly via TLR4, which results in net loss of cartilage. Thus, sBGN can be a mediator of OA cartilage degradation and also a potential biomarker for arthritis.
  • Herczeg, Gábor; Gonda, Abigél; Balázs, Gergely; Noreikiene, Kristina; Merilä, Juha (BioMed Central, 2015)
    Abstract Background Plasticity in brain size and the size of different brain regions during early ontogeny is known from many vertebrate taxa, but less is known about plasticity in the brains of adults. In contrast to mammals and birds, most parts of a fish’s brain continue to undergo neurogenesis throughout adulthood, making lifelong plasticity in brain size possible. We tested whether maturing adult three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) reared in a stimulus-poor environment exhibited brain plasticity in response to environmental enrichment, and whether these responses were sex-specific, thus altering the degree of sexual size dimorphism in the brain. Results Relative sizes of total brain and bulbus olfactorius showed sex-specific responses to treatment: males developed larger brains but smaller bulbi olfactorii than females in the enriched treatment. Hence, the degree of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) in relative brain size and the relative size of the bulbus olfactorius was found to be environment-dependent. Furthermore, the enriched treatment induced development of smaller tecta optica in both sexes. Conclusions These results demonstrate that adult fish can alter the size of their brain (or brain regions) in response to environmental stimuli, and these responses can be sex-specific. Hence, the degree of SSD in brain size can be environment-dependent, and our results hint at the possibility of a large plastic component to SSD in stickleback brains. Apart from contributing to our understanding of the processes shaping and explaining variation in brain size and the size of different brain regions in the wild, the results show that provision of structural complexity in captive environments can influence brain development. Assuming that the observed plasticity influences fish behaviour, these findings may also have relevance for fish stocking, both for economical and conservational purposes.
  • Lazkov, Georgy; Sennikov, Alexander Nikolaevich (Societas pro fauna et flora Fennica, 2015)
    A new series of notes on distribution, taxonomy, morphology and nomenclature of some vascular plants in Kyrgyzstan is presented. Carex subphysodes Popov ex V.Krecz., Astragalus sogdianus Bunge, Oxytropis ferganensis Vass. and Iris maracandica (Vved.) Wendelbo (all native), and also Delphinium orientalis J.Gay (alien) are reported as new to Kyrgyzstan. Sedum tetramerum Trautv. is new to Northern Tian-Shan, and Scirpoides holoschoenus (L.) Soják is new to Chatkal Range and Western Tian-Shan within Kyrgyzstan. The distribution area of Torilis arvensis (Huds.) Link is revised and expanded, and the distribution of Eremurus zoae Vved. (endemic to Kyrgyzstan) is verified and mapped. New names and combinations, Betonica sect. Foliosae (Krestovsk. & Lazkov) Lazkov, Eriophyton anomalum (Juz.) Lazkov & Sennikov, Kudrjaschevia sect. Jacubianae Lazkov, Lagochilus sect. Chlainanthus (Briq.) Lazkov, Leonurus sect. Panzerioidei (Krestovsk.) Lazkov, Phlomoides sect. Pseuderemostachys (Popov) Lazkov, and Scutellaria sect. Ramosissimae Lazkov, are provided as a result of the forthcoming monographic revision of Lamiaceae. Two hybrids are described in Eremurus, E. fuscus × E. cristatus = E. nikitinae Lazkov and E. cristatus × E. zoae = E. gypsaceus Lazkov. Places of valid publication and the authorship of Iris svetlanae (Vved.) T.Hall & Seisums and Erianthera anomala Juz. are corrected. Iris svetlanae is synonymized with I. maracandica. A new colour form (with pinkish flowers) of Betonica betoniciflora (Rupr. ex O.Fedtsch. & B.Fedtsch.) Sennikov is described. English-language designations are provided for the map of biogeographic provinces of Kyrgyzstan.
  • Bofah, Emmanuel A; Hannula, Markku S (Springer US, 2015)
    Abstract Relationships among motivational constructs from the 2011 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS 2011) were investigated for eight-graders in all the five participating African countries, representing 38,806 (49 % girls). First, we investigated the psychometric properties (factor structure, reliabilities, method effect, and measurement invariance—country and gender) of the mathematics motivational constructs across the five educational systems. There was empirical support for the multidimensionality of the construct and the TIMSS 2011 motivational construct was largely invariant across cultures. Furthermore, a series of confirmatory factor analyses revealed that there is a need to control method effects associated with negatively worded items in the measurement model. There was support suggesting that in many cultures responses to negatively worded items are systematically different. The factor structures and reliabilities (i.e., confidence and the like mathematics scales) were affected by negatively worded items. Second, the relationships between the constructs, achievements and background variables such as parental education, gender and students’ educational aspirations were investigated. We identified several significant relationships between self-belief and mathematics achievement. Differences in the latent mean achievement and the motivational construct were similar to those that have been described in the literature as “paradoxical” and “perplexing”. Nations with high mathematics achievement seem to have students with more negative mathematics self-belief. Some results extend, whereas others refute the findings of previous research. For instance, the relationship between students’ mathematics confidence and mathematics achievement was lower than the relationship between the value of mathematics and achievement in some countries and it was the reverse in others. However, consistent with cultural stereotypes, boys rated their mathematics competence higher than girls. The findings are discussed with reference to implications for cross-cultural research and practice.
  • Eeva, Tapio; Andersson, Tommi; Berglund, Åsa M M; Brommer, Jon E; Hyvönen, Raimo; Klemola, Tero; Laaksonen, Toni; Loukola, Olli; Morosinotto, Chiara; Rainio, Kalle; Sirkiä, Päivi M; Vesterinen, Eero J (BioMed Central, 2015)
    Abstract Background Birds host several ectoparasitic fly species with negative effects on nestling health and reproductive output, and with the capability of transmitting avian blood parasites. Information on the abundance and distribution of the ectoparasitic fly genera Ornithomya (Hippoboscidae) and Protocalliphora (Calliphoridae) in northern Europe is still generally poor, and we thus explored their geographic range and occurrence of these flies in the nests of a common avian model species, the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca. Methods Nests of F. hypoleuca were collected from 21 locations across Fennoscandia in summer 2013, across a latitudinal gradient (between 56 °N – 70 °N) and examined for the presence of fly puparia. Adult specimens of Ornithomya spp. were also collected for species identification. Fly species were identified morphologically and identifications confirmed with DNA barcoding. Results We found three species: two louse-flies − Ornithomya chloropus and O. avicularia − and one blow-fly, Protocalliphora azurea. The prevalence of O. avicularia was higher in southern latitudes and this species was not encountered beyond 62 °N whereas O. chloropus and P. azurea occurred across the whole range of latitudes. The prevalence of O. chloropus further increased with increasing distance from the coast – a pattern not documented before. The three fly species showed no interspecific associations in their prevalence. Conclusions Our study revealed relatively high prevalence for all the species (O. chloropus 59 %, O. avicularia 20 %, P. azurea 32 %), and an interesting spatial pattern in the prevalence of the two louse fly species. Our sample did not indicate any major range shifts towards the north for the southern species as compared to the information from the past. Morphological identification of O. chloropus did not match with the corresponding sequences published in the GenBank and taxonomy of this group calls for further studies.
  • Akhgari, Amir; Laakso, Into; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Yrjönen, Teijo; Vuorela, Heikki; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Rischer, Heiko (MOLECULAR DIVERSITY PRESERVATION INTERNATIONAL, 2015)
    Rhazya stricta Decne. (Apocynaceae) contains a large number of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs). This study focused on the composition of alkaloids obtained from transformed hairy root cultures of R. stricta employing ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). In the UPLC-MS analyses, a total of 20 TIAs were identified from crude extracts. Eburenine and vincanine were the main alkaloids followed by polar glucoalkaloids, strictosidine lactam and strictosidine. Secodine-type alkaloids, tetrahydrosecodinol, tetrahydro- and dihydrosecodine were detected too. The occurrence of tetrahydrosecodinol was confirmed for the first time for R. stricta. Furthermore, two isomers of yohimbine, serpentine and vallesiachotamine were identified. The study shows that a characteristic pattern of biosynthetically related TIAs can be monitored in Rhazya hairy root crude extract by this chromatographic method.
  • Berninger, Frank; Susiluoto, Sannamaija; Gianelle, Damiano; Bahn, Michael; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Sutton, Mark; Garcia-Pausas, Jordi; Gimeno, Cristina; Sanz, Maria J.; Dore, Sabina; Rogiers, Nele; Furger, Markus; Eugster, Werner; Balzarolo, Manuela; Teresa Sebastia, M.; Tenhunen, John; Staszewski, Tomasz; Cernusca, Alexander (Finnish Environment Institute, 2015)
    We studied carbon balances and carbon stocks of mountain rangelands and meadows in a network of 8 eddy covariance sites and 14 sites with biomass data in Europe. Net ecosystem exchange of pastures and extensively managed semi-natural rangelands were usually close to zero, while meadows fixed carbon, with the exception of one meadow that was established on a drained peatland. When we accounted for off-site losses and inputs also the carbon budget of meadows approached zero. Soil carbon stocks in these ecosystems were high, comparable to those of forest ecosystems, while carbon stocks in plant biomass were smaller. Since soil carbon stocks of abandoned mountain grasslands are as high as in managed ecosystems, it is likely that the widespread abandonment of mountain rangelands used currently as pastures will not lead to an immediate carbon sink in those ecosystems.
  • Adam, J.; Adamova, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anticic, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshaueser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badala, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Pedrosa, F. Baltasar Dos Santos; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnafoeldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Camejo, A. Batista; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Boggild, H.; Boldizsar, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossu, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Boettger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Diaz, L. Calero; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castellanos, J. Castillo; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Barroso, V. Chibante; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Chunhui, Z.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Balbastre, G. Conesa; del Valle, Z. Conesa; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Morales, Y. Corrales; Cortes Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Denes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divia, R.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Doenigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernandez Tellez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. 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G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Zavada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M. (Elsevier B. V., 2015)
    We have performed the first measurement of the coherent psi(2S) photo-production cross section in ultraperipheral Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC. This charmonium excited state is reconstructed via the psi(2S) -> l(+)l(-) and ->(2S) -> J/psi pi(+)pi(-) decays, where the J/psi decays into two leptons. The analysis is based on an event sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 22 mu b(-1). The cross section for coherent psi(2S) production in the rapidity interval -0.9 <y <0.9is d sigma(coh)(psi(2S))/dy = 0.83 +/- 0.19 (stat+syst) mb. The psi(2S) to J/psi coherent cross section ratio is 0.34(-0.07)(+0.08)(stat+syst). The obtained results are compared to predictions from theoretical models. (C) 2015 CERN for the benefit of the ALICE Collaboration. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Seibold, Petra; Schmezer, Peter; Behrens, Sabine; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe G; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Jager, Agnes; Seynaeve, Caroline; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Dunning, Alison M; Rhenius, Valerie; Shah, Mitul; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Hamann, Ute; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Purrington, Kristen S; Couch, Fergus J; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul; Easton, Doug F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Popanda, Odilia (BioMed Central, 2015)
    Abstract Background Personalized therapy considering clinical and genetic patient characteristics will further improve breast cancer survival. Two widely used treatments, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, can induce oxidative DNA damage and, if not repaired, cell death. Since base excision repair (BER) activity is specific for oxidative DNA damage, we hypothesized that germline genetic variation in this pathway will affect breast cancer-specific survival depending on treatment. Methods We assessed in 1,408 postmenopausal breast cancer patients from the German MARIE study whether cancer specific survival after adjuvant chemotherapy, anthracycline chemotherapy, and radiotherapy is modulated by 127 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in 21 BER genes. For SNPs with interaction terms showing p < 0.1 (likelihood ratio test) using multivariable Cox proportional hazard analyses, replication in 6,392 patients from nine studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) was performed. Results rs878156 in PARP2 showed a differential effect by chemotherapy (p = 0.093) and was replicated in BCAC studies (p = 0.009; combined analysis p = 0.002). Compared to non-carriers, carriers of the variant G allele (minor allele frequency = 0.07) showed better survival after chemotherapy (combined allelic hazard ratio (HR) = 0.75, 95 % 0.53–1.07) and poorer survival when not treated with chemotherapy (HR = 1.42, 95 % 1.08–1.85). A similar effect modification by rs878156 was observed for anthracycline-based chemotherapy in both MARIE and BCAC, with improved survival in carriers (combined allelic HR = 0.73, 95 % CI 0.40–1.32). None of the SNPs showed significant differential effects by radiotherapy. Conclusions Our data suggest for the first time that a SNP in PARP2, rs878156, may together with other genetic variants modulate cancer specific survival in breast cancer patients depending on chemotherapy. These germline SNPs could contribute towards the design of predictive tests for breast cancer patients.