Performance in humanitarian supply chains

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/135682
Title: Performance in humanitarian supply chains
Author: Haavisto, Ira
Contributor: Svenska handelshögskolan, Institutionen för marknadsföring, Logistik och företagsgeografi
Hanken School of Economics, Department of Marketing, Supply Chain Management and Corporate Geography
Belongs to series: Economics and Society – 275
ISSN: 0424-7256 (printed)
ISBN: 978-952-232-241-8 (printed)
978-952-232-242-5 (PDF)
Abstract: The goals of humanitarian organizations are to save lives, decrease human suffering, and contribute to development. However, humanitarian response has been criticized for its lack of positive impact on the societies receiving aid, or more precisely, for the lack of the effectiveness of the aid. Discussion of the effectiveness of aid has seemingly been incorporated at the operational level as focus on cost and time efficiency. However, efficiency considerations have been criticized because they can lead to oversight of other considerations, such as sustainability. Humanitarian practitioners have started paying attention to measuring their performance. Measuring the performance of humanitarian operations, however, can be cumbersome, due to the complexity of the operating environment, which has limited data accessibility and multiple actors involved. This thesis’ overall aim is to analyze how supply chain performance is understood in the humanitarian context. The research questions are deliberated on in four essays. Each essay has a different scope, ranging from an intra-organizational supply chain perspective to a macro perspective on country logistics performance. This thesis builds mainly on the literature about humanitarian supply chain and its performance measurement. To date, the performance literature in the humanitarian context has covered different performance measurement frameworks and suggested specific key performance indicators. However, it has not yet tackled the essence of performance measurement, which should be connected to the goal of the activity at hand and support learning and development.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/135682
Date: 2014-08-05
Subject: supply chain
humanitarian supply chain
performance management
performance objective
performance measurement
logistics performance indicators
impact
contingency theory


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