Understanding, quantifying and mapping the use of poison by commercial farmers in Namibia - Implications for scavengers' conservation and ecosystem health

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Santangeli , A , Arkumarev , V , Rust , N & Girardello , M 2016 , ' Understanding, quantifying and mapping the use of poison by commercial farmers in Namibia - Implications for scavengers' conservation and ecosystem health ' , Biological Conservation , vol. 204 , pp. 205-211 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2016.10.018

Title: Understanding, quantifying and mapping the use of poison by commercial farmers in Namibia - Implications for scavengers' conservation and ecosystem health
Author: Santangeli, Andrea; Arkumarev, Volen; Rust, Niki; Girardello, Marco
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Finnish Museum of Natural History
Date: 2016-12
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: Biological Conservation
ISSN: 0006-3207
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/174500
Abstract: Effective nature conservation in human-dominated landscapes requires a deep understanding of human behaviors, perceptions and values. Human-wildlife conflicts represent relatively well-studied, global-scale conservation challenges. In Africa, vulture populations are collapsing as they fall victim to poison used by livestock farmers to kill predators, but our understanding of the prevalence of this practice is still very poor. We gathered data on the prevalence of poison use in Namibia by means of questionnaires completed by commercial farmers. The data were collected and analyzed with ad-hoc quantitative methods. We quantified prevalence of poison use, determined factors associated with this practice and derived a map of its prevalence. We found that 20% of commercial farmers in Namibia used poison; farmers that owned high numbers of small stock and on large farms, and those who had suffered high livestock losses to predators, were most likely to admit to using poison. We pinpoint areas of high prevalence of reported poison use, which are largely concentrated in the south of the country. Furthermore, we report a generally positive perception of commercial farmers towards vultures, which may indicate future potential to implement bottom-up approaches for vulture conservation. Overall, the findings have important implications for prioritizing efforts to effectively tackle the African vulture crisis and preserve healthy ecosystems for the wellbeing of humans and wildlife. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Subject: African vulture crisis
Commercial farmer
Human-wildlife conflict
Modern conservation
Poison use
Vulture collapse
RANDOMIZED-RESPONSE
ILLEGAL BEHAVIOR
WILD FAUNA
ATTITUDES
SERVICES
LANDSCAPES
CARNIVORES
DISEASE
HUMANS
1172 Environmental sciences
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