Adaptive and non-adaptive models of depression : A comparison using register data on antidepressant medication during divorce

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Rosenstrom , T , Fawcett , T W , Higginson , A D , Metsa-Simola , N , Hagen , E H , Houston , A I & Martikainen , P 2017 , ' Adaptive and non-adaptive models of depression : A comparison using register data on antidepressant medication during divorce ' , PLoS One , vol. 12 , no. 6 , 0179495 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0179495

Title: Adaptive and non-adaptive models of depression : A comparison using register data on antidepressant medication during divorce
Author: Rosenstrom, Tom; Fawcett, Tim W.; Higginson, Andrew D.; Metsa-Simola, Niina; Hagen, Edward H.; Houston, Alasdair I.; Martikainen, Pekka
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, University of Helsinki
University of Helsinki, Center for Population, Health and Society
University of Helsinki, Department of Social Research (2010-2017)





Date: 2017-06-14
Language: eng
Number of pages: 25
Belongs to series: PLoS One
ISSN: 1932-6203
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0179495
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/214835
Abstract: Divorce is associated with an increased probability of a depressive episode, but the causation of events remains unclear. Adaptive models of depression propose that depression is a social strategy in part, whereas non-adaptive models tend to propose a diathesis-stress mechanism. We compare an adaptive evolutionary model of depression to three alternative non-adaptive models with respect to their ability to explain the temporal pattern of depression around the time of divorce. Register-based data (304,112 individuals drawn from a random sample of 11% of Finnish people) on antidepressant purchases is used as a proxy for depression. This proxy affords an unprecedented temporal resolution (a 3-monthly prevalence estimates over 10 years) without any bias from non-compliance, and it can be linked with underlying episodes via a statistical model. The evolutionary-adaptation model (all time periods with risk of divorce are depressogenic) was the best quantitative description of the data. The non-adaptive stress-relief model (period before divorce is depressogenic and period afterwards is not) provided the second best quantitative description of the data. The peak-stress model (periods before and after divorce can be depressogenic) fit the data less well, and the stress-induction model (period following divorce is depressogenic and the preceding period is not) did not fit the data at all. The evolutionary model was the most detailed mechanistic description of the divorce-depression link among the models, and the best fit in terms of predicted curvature; thus, it offers most rigorous hypotheses for further study. The stress-relief model also fit very well and was the best model in a sensitivity analysis, encouraging development of more mechanistic models for that hypothesis.
Subject: BIPOLAR MOOD DISORDERS
STRESSFUL LIFE EVENTS
POPULATION-BASED TWIN
DSM-IV CRITERIA
MAJOR DEPRESSION
SUICIDE ATTEMPTS
MENDELIAN RANDOMIZATION
PERSONALITY-DISORDERS
UNITED-STATES
ALL-CAUSE
515 Psychology
5141 Sociology
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