A potential barrier to the spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi (Ostroumov 1891) in the Northern Baltic Sea

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/224188

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Rowe , O , Guleikova , L , Brugel , S , Byström , P & Andersson , A 2016 , ' A potential barrier to the spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi (Ostroumov 1891) in the Northern Baltic Sea ' Regional Studies in Marine Science , vol 3 , pp. 8-17 . DOI: 10.1016/j.rsma.2015.12.004

Title: A potential barrier to the spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi (Ostroumov 1891) in the Northern Baltic Sea
Author: Rowe, Owen; Guleikova, Liudmyla; Brugel, Sonia; Byström, Pär; Andersson, Agneta
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Food and Environmental Sciences
Belongs to series: Regional Studies in Marine Science
ISSN: 2352-4855
Abstract: The spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi has been well documented in southern areas of the Baltic Sea, however, little research on this invasive species (nor the zooplankton community) has focused on the Gulf of Bothnia (Bothnian Sea and Bay). We analysed data collected over a 12–13 year period at two main stations, one coastal and one offshore, to examine the occurrence of C. pengoi, invasion dynamics, effects on natural zooplankton communities and associated environmental factors. Nine other stations in the Gulf of Bothnia were also examined and the contribution to three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) diet was quantified. The zooplankton community response apparently differed between coastal and offshore stations with Bosmina, Eurytemora, and Acartia populations being influenced during peak abundances of C. pengoi. It appears that the native zooplankton community has some resilience, returning to its prior structure outside of peak invasion periods. C. pengoi, where present, contributed significantly to stickleback diet. We explored possible barriers for C. pengoi in the Bothnian Bay, suggesting that the low productive Bothnian Bay ecosystem may be incapable of supporting such a predator. This highlights the need for further studies, especially in the light of global climate change.
Peer review status: Peer reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/224188
Date: 2016
Subject: 1172 Environmental sciences
Rights: Creative Commons License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)


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