Seafloor sediments as microplastic sinks in the northern Baltic Sea : Negligible upward transport of buried microplastics by bioturbation

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/303678

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Näkki , P , Setälä , O & Lehtiniemi , M 2019 , ' Seafloor sediments as microplastic sinks in the northern Baltic Sea : Negligible upward transport of buried microplastics by bioturbation ' , Environmental Pollution , vol. 249 , pp. 74-81 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2019.02.099

Title: Seafloor sediments as microplastic sinks in the northern Baltic Sea : Negligible upward transport of buried microplastics by bioturbation
Author: Näkki, Pinja; Setälä, Outi; Lehtiniemi, Maiju
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Tvärminne Zoological Station
University of Helsinki, Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE)
University of Helsinki, Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE)
Date: 2019-06
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Environmental Pollution
ISSN: 0269-7491
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/303678
Abstract: Microplastics (MPs) are ubiquitous in the marine environment. High concentrations of MPs are found from seafloor sediments, which have been proposed to act as their final sinks. Because bioturbation is an important process affecting the burial of MPs, a mesocosm experiment was established to study whether sediment infauna may also promote MP return to the sediment surface. Thin layers of frozen sediment containing an environmentally realistic concentration (500 μm and 100–300 μm) were added to depths of 2 cm and 5 cm in the experimental cylinders filled with sediment. The displacement of these MPs, made of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), by a community of common benthic invertebrates in the northern Baltic Sea (clam Limecola balthica, polychaete Marenzelleria spp., gammarid Monoporeia affinis) was studied in a 10-week experiment. After the experiment, the MPs were extracted from each sediment layer and the animals were examined for MP ingestion. The results indicated that the transportation of MPs to the sediment surface by bioturbation was negligible. Thus, in the Baltic Sea, the seafloor may act as a sink for once sedimented MPs, reducing simultaneously the MP exposure of the macrofauna feeding on the sediment surface.
Subject: 1172 Environmental sciences
Secondary microplastic
Baltic sea
Bioturbation
spp
Marenzelleria spp
ENVIRONMENT
IRRIGATION
BENTHIC INVERTEBRATES
MYTILUS-EDULIS
Baltic Sea
REWORKING
BIOACCUMULATION
IMPACT
INGESTION
MONOPOREIA-AFFINIS
Limecola balthica
ARENICOLA-MARINA
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