Allo-parental care in Damaraland mole-rats is female biased and age dependent, though independent of testosterone levels

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/311639

Citation

Zöttl , M , Vullioud , P , Goddard , K , Torrents-Ticó , M , Gaynor , D , Bennett , N C & Clutton-Brock , T 2018 , ' Allo-parental care in Damaraland mole-rats is female biased and age dependent, though independent of testosterone levels ' , Physiology & Behavior , vol. 193 , no. Part A , pp. 149-153 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.03.021

Title: Allo-parental care in Damaraland mole-rats is female biased and age dependent, though independent of testosterone levels
Author: Zöttl, Markus; Vullioud, Philippe; Goddard, Katy; Torrents-Ticó, Miquel; Gaynor, David; Bennett, Nigel C.; Clutton-Brock, Tim
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
Date: 2018-09-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 5
Belongs to series: Physiology & Behavior
ISSN: 0031-9384
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/311639
Abstract: Abstract In Damaraland mole-rats (Fukomys damarensis), non-breeding subordinates contribute to the care of offspring born to the breeding pair in their group by carrying and retrieving young to the nest. In social mole-rats and some cooperative breeders, dominant females show unusually high testosterone levels and it has been suggested that high testosterone levels may increase reproductive and aggressive behavior and reduce investment in allo-parental and parental care, generating age and state-dependent variation in behavior. Here we show that, in Damaraland mole-rats, allo-parental care in males and females is unaffected by experimental increases in testosterone levels. Pup carrying decreases with age of the non-breeding helper while the change in social status from non-breeder to breeder has contrasting effects in the two sexes. Female breeders were more likely than female non-breeders to carry pups but male breeders were less likely to carry pups than male non-breeders, increasing the sex bias in parental care compared to allo-parental care. Our results indicate that testosterone is unlikely to be an important regulator of allo-parental care in mole-rats.
Subject: Testosterone
Allo-parental care
Parental care
Sex bias
Age related polyethism
VOLES MICROTUS-OCHROGASTER
PRAIRIE VOLES
COOPERATIVE BEHAVIOR
BIRDS
EVOLUTION
HELPERS
SUBORDINATE
SUPPRESSION
SOCIETIES
SELECTION
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
Zottl_et_al._20 ... of_testosterone_levels.pdf 459.9Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record