Job insecurity and risk of coronary heart disease : Mediation analyses of health behaviors, sleep problems, physiological and psychological factors

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/317745

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Hanson , L L M , Rod , N H , Vahtera , J , Virtanen , M , Ferrie , J , Shipley , M , Kivimäki , M & Westerlund , H 2020 , ' Job insecurity and risk of coronary heart disease : Mediation analyses of health behaviors, sleep problems, physiological and psychological factors ' , Psychoneuroendocrinology , vol. 118 , 104706 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2020.104706

Title: Job insecurity and risk of coronary heart disease : Mediation analyses of health behaviors, sleep problems, physiological and psychological factors
Author: Hanson, Linda L. Magnusson; Rod, Naja H.; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Marianna; Ferrie, Jane; Shipley, Martin; Kivimäki, Mika; Westerlund, Hugo
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Karolinska Institutet
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
Date: 2020-08
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Psychoneuroendocrinology
ISSN: 0306-4530
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/317745
Abstract: Job insecurity has been linked to increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but underlying mechanisms remain uncertain. Our aim was to assess the extent to which this association is mediated through life style, physiological, or psychological factors. A total of 3917 men and women free from CHD provided data on job insecurity in the Whitehall II cohort study in 1997-1999. The association between job insecurity and CHD was decomposed into a direct and indirect effect mediated through unhealthy behaviors (smoking, high alcohol consumption, physical inactivity), sleep disturbances, 'allostatic load', or psychological distress. The counterfactual analyses on psychological distress indicated a marginally significant association between job insecurity and incident CHD (hazard ratio (HR) 1.32; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.75). This association was decomposed into a direct (HR 1.22, 95 %CI 0.92-1.63) and indirect association (1.08, 95 %CI 1.01-1.15), suggesting that about 30 % of the total relationship was mediated by psychological distress. No mediation was indicated via health behaviors, sleep disturbances, or allostatic load, although job insecurity was related to disturbed sleep and C-reactive protein, which, in turn were associated with CHD. In conclusion, our results suggest that psychological distress may play a role in the relation between job insecurity and CHD.
Subject: Job insecurity
Cardiovascular disease
Mechanisms
Sleep
Allostatic load
Depressive symptoms
BRITISH CIVIL-SERVANTS
CUMULATIVE BIOLOGICAL RISK
ALLOSTATIC LOAD
UNEMPLOYMENT
ASSOCIATIONS
EXPOSURE
STRESS
COHORT
MEN
515 Psychology
3121 General medicine, internal medicine and other clinical medicine
3112 Neurosciences
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
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