The Precipitation Imaging Package: Assessment of Microphysical and Bulk Characteristics of Snow

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/318206

Citation

Pettersen, C.; Bliven, L.F.; von Lerber, A.; Wood, N.B.; Kulie, M.S.; Mateling, M.E.; Moisseev, D.N.; Munchak, S.J.; Petersen, W.A.; Wolff, D.B. The Precipitation Imaging Package: Assessment of Microphysical and Bulk Characteristics of Snow. Atmosphere 2020, 11, 785.

Title: The Precipitation Imaging Package: Assessment of Microphysical and Bulk Characteristics of Snow
Author: Pettersen, Claire; Bliven, Larry F.; von Lerber, Annakaisa; Wood, Norman B.; Kulie, Mark S.; Mateling, Marian E.; Moisseev, Dmitri N.; Munchak, S. Joseph; Petersen, Walter A.; Wolff, David B.
Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Date: 2020-07-24
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/318206
Abstract: Remote-sensing observations are needed to estimate the regional and global impacts of snow. However, to retrieve accurate estimates of snow mass and rate, these observations require augmentation through additional information and assumptions about hydrometeor properties. The Precipitation Imaging Package (PIP) provides information about precipitation characteristics and can be utilized to improve estimates of snowfall rate and accumulation. Here, the goal is to demonstrate the quality and utility of two higher-order PIP-derived products: liquid water equivalent snow rate and an approximation of volume-weighted density called equivalent density. Accuracy of the PIP snow rate and equivalent density is obtained through intercomparison with established retrieval methods and through evaluation with colocated ground-based observations. The results confirm the ability of the PIP-derived products to quantify properties of snow rate and equivalent density, and demonstrate that the PIP produces physically realistic snow characteristics. When compared to the National Weather Service (NWS) snow field measurements of six-hourly accumulation, the PIP-derived accumulations were biased only +2.48% higher. Additionally, this work illustrates fundamentally different microphysical and bulk features of low and high snow-to-liquid ratio events, through assessment of observed particle size distributions, retrieved mass coefficients, and bulk properties. Importantly, this research establishes the role that PIP observations and higher-order products can serve for constraining microphysical assumptions in ground-based and spaceborne remotely sensed snowfall retrievals.


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
atmosphere-11-00785-v2.pdf 7.432Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record