Administration of inhaled noble and other gases after cardiopulmonary resuscitation : A systematic review

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Alshami , A , Einav , S , Skrifvars , M B & Varon , J 2020 , ' Administration of inhaled noble and other gases after cardiopulmonary resuscitation : A systematic review ' , American Journal of Emergency Medicine , vol. 38 , no. 10 , pp. 2179-2184 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2020.06.066

Title: Administration of inhaled noble and other gases after cardiopulmonary resuscitation : A systematic review
Author: Alshami, Abbas; Einav, Sharon; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Varon, Joseph
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, HUS Emergency Medicine and Services


Date: 2020-10
Language: eng
Number of pages: 6
Belongs to series: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
ISSN: 0735-6757
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2020.06.066
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/329677
Abstract: Objective: Inhalation of noble and other gases after cardiac arrest (CA) might improve neurological and cardiac outcomes. This article discusses up-to-date information on this novel therapeutic intervention. Data sources: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, online published abstracts from conference proceedings, clinical trial registry clinicaltrials.gov, and reference lists of relevant papers were systematically searched from January 1960 till March 2019. Study selection: Preclinical and clinical studies, irrespective of their types or described outcomes, were included. Data extraction: Abstract screening, study selection, and data extraction were performed by two independent authors. Due to the paucity of human trials, risk of bias assessment was not performed DATA SYNTHESIS: After screening 281 interventional studies, we included an overall of 27. Only, xenon, helium, hydrogen, and nitric oxide have been or are being studied on humans. Xenon, nitric oxide, and hydrogen show both neuroprotective and cardiotonic features, while argon and hydrogen sulfide seem neuroprotective, but not cardiotonic. Most gases have elicited neurohistological protection in preclinical studies; however, only hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide appeared to preserve CA1 sector of hippocampus, the most vulnerable area in the brain for hypoxia. Conclusion: Inhalation of certain gases after CPR appears promising in mitigating neurological and cardiac damage and may become the next successful neuroprotective and cardiotonic interventions. (C) 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Subject: Noble gases
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
Heart arrest
Neuroprotection
Cardioprotection
Nitric oxide
Hydrogen
HOSPITAL CARDIAC-ARREST
REDUCES NEUROHISTOPATHOLOGICAL DAMAGE
CARBON-MONOXIDE
NITRIC-OXIDE
HYDROGEN-SULFIDE
COMATOSE SURVIVORS
PORCINE MODEL
RAT MODEL
XENON
IMPROVES
3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology
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