Lessons for human survival in a world without ecological templates : what can we learn from small-scale societies?

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/333348

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Kaaronen , R O , Manninen , M A , Roe , E M , Hukkinen , J & Eronen , J T 2021 , ' Lessons for human survival in a world without ecological templates : what can we learn from small-scale societies? ' , Ecology and Society , vol. 26 , no. 3:2 . https://doi.org/10.5751/ES-12476-260302

Title: Lessons for human survival in a world without ecological templates : what can we learn from small-scale societies?
Author: Kaaronen, Roope Oskari; Manninen, Mikael A.; Roe, Emery Martin; Hukkinen, Janne; Eronen, Jussi T.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Past Present Sustainability (PAES) research Unit
University of Helsinki, Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme
University of Helsinki, Faculty Common Matters
University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
University of Helsinki, Past Present Sustainability (PAES) research Unit
Date: 2021-07-14
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Ecology and Society
ISSN: 1708-3087
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/333348
Abstract: Historical records are incomplete templates for preparing for an uncertain future. The global utility of past ecological knowledge for present/future purposes is questioned as we move from Holocene to Anthropocene. To increase the adaptive capacity of today’s societies, generalizable strategies must be identified for coping with uncertainty over a wide range of conditions and contingencies. We identify two key principles that increase adaptive capacities: diversification and precautionary heuristics. These sharply contrast with the present global state represented by the global production ecosystem characterized by: (1) homogenization and simplification of cultural practices and resource bases; (2) increased global connectivity and forced dissolution of cultural borders; and (3) centralization and intensification of modes of resource production and extraction. We highlight that responses of smaller-scale societies to risks and uncertainties are in many cases emulated by professionals in the high reliability management in today’s critical infrastructures. This provides a modern template for managing unpredictability in the Anthropocene.
Subject: 1172 Environmental sciences
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
5202 Economic and Social History
5203 Global Development Studies
615 History and Archaeology
5143 Social and cultural anthropology
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