A wake-up call : Sleep physiology and related translational discrepancies in studies of rapid-acting antidepressants

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Alitalo , O , Saarreharju , R , Henter , I D , Jr , C A Z , Kohtala , S & Rantamäki , T 2021 , ' A wake-up call : Sleep physiology and related translational discrepancies in studies of rapid-acting antidepressants ' , Progress in Neurobiology , vol. 206 , 102140 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pneurobio.2021.102140

Title: A wake-up call : Sleep physiology and related translational discrepancies in studies of rapid-acting antidepressants
Author: Alitalo, Okko; Saarreharju, Roosa; Henter, Ioline D.; Jr, Carlos A. Zarate; Kohtala, Samuel; Rantamäki, Tomi
Contributor organization: Division of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy
Laboratory of Neurotherapeutics
Drug Research Program
SLEEPWELL Research Program
Medicum
Date: 2021-11
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Progress in Neurobiology
ISSN: 0301-0082
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pneurobio.2021.102140
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/334821
Abstract: Depression is frequently associated with sleep problems, and clinical improvement often coincides with the normalization of sleep architecture and realignment of circadian rhythm. The effectiveness of treatments targeting sleep in depressed patients, such as sleep deprivation, further demonstrates the confluence of sleep and mood. Moreover, recent studies showing that the rapid-acting antidepressant ketamine influences processes related to sleep-wake neurobiology have led to novel hypotheses explaining rapid and sustained antidepressant effects. Despite the available evidence, studies addressing ketamine's antidepressant effects have focused on pharmacology and often overlooked the role of physiology. To explore this discrepancy in research on rapid acting antidepressants, we examined articles published between 2009-2019. A keyword search algorithm indicated that vast majority of the articles completely ignored sleep. Out of the 100 most frequently cited pre clinical and clinical research papers, 89 % and 71 %, respectively, did not mention sleep at all. Furthermore, only a handful of these articles disclosed key experimental variables, such as the times of treatment administration or behavioral testing, let alone considered the potential association between these variables and experimental observations. Notably, in preclinical studies, treatments were preferentially administered during the inactive period, which is the polar opposite of clinical practice and research. We discuss the potential impact of this practice on the results in the field. Our hope is that this perspective will serve as a wake-up call to (re)-examine rapid-acting antidepressant effects with more appreciation for the role of sleep and chronobiology.
Subject: Depression&nbsp
Rapid-acting antidepressant
Sleep
Circadian&nbsp
rhythm
Pharmacology
Translational&nbsp
research
TREATMENT-RESISTANT DEPRESSION
COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY
D-ASPARTATE ANTAGONIST
ELECTROCONVULSIVE-THERAPY
OPTOGENETIC STIMULATION
ORAL ANTIDEPRESSANT
CIRCADIAN-RHYTHM
KETAMINE
DEPRIVATION
PLASTICITY
3112 Neurosciences
317 Pharmacy
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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