Molecular Imaging of Central Dopamine in Obesity : A Qualitative Review across Substrates and Radiotracers

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Janssen , L K & Horstmann , A 2022 , ' Molecular Imaging of Central Dopamine in Obesity : A Qualitative Review across Substrates and Radiotracers ' , Brain Sciences , vol. 12 , no. 4 , 486 . https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12040486

Title: Molecular Imaging of Central Dopamine in Obesity : A Qualitative Review across Substrates and Radiotracers
Author: Janssen, Lieneke Katharina; Horstmann, Annette
Contributor organization: O'BRAIN Lab
Department of Psychology and Logopedics
Date: 2022-04-08
Language: eng
Number of pages: 20
Belongs to series: Brain Sciences
ISSN: 2076-3425
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12040486
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/343058
Abstract: Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that plays a crucial role in adaptive behavior. A wealth of studies suggests obesity-related alterations in the central dopamine system. The most direct evidence for such differences in humans comes from molecular neuroimaging studies using positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The aim of the current review is to give a comprehensive overview of molecular neuroimaging studies that investigated the relation between BMI or weight status and any dopamine target in the striatal and midbrain regions of the human brain. A structured literature search was performed and a summary of the extracted findings are presented for each of the four available domains: (1) D2/D3 receptors, (2) dopamine release, (3) dopamine synthesis, and (4) dopamine transporters. Recent proposals of a nonlinear relationship between severity of obesity and dopamine imbalances are described while integrating findings within and across domains, after which limitations of the review are discussed. We conclude that despite many observed associations between obesity and substrates of the dopamine system in humans, it is unlikely that obesity can be traced back to a single dopaminergic cause or consequence. For effective personalized prevention and treatment of obesity, it will be crucial to identify possible dopamine (and non-dopamine) profiles and their functional characteristics.
Subject: BMI
BODY-MASS INDEX
D-2/3 RECEPTOR AVAILABILITY
FOOD ADDICTION
HEALTHY-VOLUNTEERS
MESENCEPHALIC DOPAMINE
NEURAL MECHANISMS
NUCLEUS-ACCUMBENS CORE
OPPOSING ROLES
Positron Emission Tomography
RELEASE
SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER BINDING
dopamine
obesity
single-photon emission tomography
3111 Biomedicine
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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